Background Information

Q



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Qu
A half-farthing

Quaker dates
In writing dates, the Quakers record the year in the conventional manner, but they use numbers instead of names for the days of the week (Sunday was the first day) and for the months, since these names were derived from those of pagan gods.

Until the Calendar reform of 1752 in which Britain adopted the Gregorian calendar, the first month was March. Thus:

5 6 1678

represents the 5th day of August, 1678, and

1st Month 29th 1856

represents the 29th of January 1856.

They might also use an expression such as:

the month commonly called August

See Gravestones at Friends Meeting House

Quaker names
Quakers and Nonconformists often used Hebrew or Old Testament Biblical names – such as

Abimelech
Abraham
Allon
Aminadab
Arphaxad
Boaz
Ehud
Eli / Ely
Eliezer
Elijah
Elkanah
Elnathan
Enoch
Esau
Ezekiel
Hagar
Hananiah
Hezekiah
Ishmael
Issachar
Japheth
Job
Joel
Joshua
Jubal
Kerenhappuch
Levi
Manasseh
Merab
Obadiah
Reuben
Shedeur
Zillah
Zimri 

The Quakers, notably those who had moved to the US, invented other names – such as

Ashes
Charity
Comfort
Content
Delight
Desire
Dust
Faint-not
Fear
Hate-evil
Hope
Humanity
Love
Lowly
Mercy
Mindwell
Obedience
Oceanus (who was born at sea) 
Patience
Silence
Thankful
What-God-Will
Wrestling 

Quakers

Quarenten
A unit of length equivalent to a furlong or a rood, or a measure of area containing forty poles, that is, 1210 square yards

Quart
A unit of capacity and volume equal to 2 pints = 1·1365 litres

Quarter
A unit of weight equal to 2 stones = 28 pounds = 12·7 kg

Quarter
A unit of capacity and volume equal to 64 gallons = 8 bushels = 290·949 litres

Quarter Clock
A clock which strikes every 15 minutes

Quarter days
Four days on which dues, payments, tenancies and other terms are renewed: Lady Day, Midsummer Day, Michaelmas, and Christmas Day.

In Scotland, they are Candlemas, Whit Sunday, Lammas, Martinmas

Quarter sessions
A quarterly court held by justices of the peace, and the main judicial and administrative bodies of the English counties. These were held from the 14th century, but records exist from the 16th century.

Halifax was granted the right to hold its own Quarter Sessions on 3rd November 1923. The first Quarter Sessions were held on 16th January 1924.

In 1972, Quarter Sessions were replaced by Crown Courts.

See Assize Courts, Willoughby Jardine, Magistrates' Court and Petty sessions

In 1889, the Local Government Act [1888] transferred many of their functions to County Councils, and in 1972, they were abolished and replaced by Crown Courts

Quartern
Aka Wortern. A measure of yarn. A quartern of wool was about 24 pounds

Quartern pudding
A pudding weighing 4 pounds

Quassia
A plant – Quassia amara – from South America. The bark has a bitter taste and was used, like grains of paradise, for the adulteration of beer in the 19th century

Queen Anne's Bounty
In 1704, an Act was passed
to make more effectual her Majesty's gracious intentions for the augmentation of the maintenance of the poor Clergy, by enabling her Majesty to grant in perpetuity the revenue of the first fruits and tenths, and also for enabling any other persons to make grants for the same purpose

Many local churches benefited from the bounty.

Wealthy benefactors gave money to the Bounty

Queen's South Africa Medal
Awarded to those who served in the Second Boer War in South Africa [1899-1902].

See King's South Africa Medal

Querent
A term used in mediæval documents meaning the plaintiff, the purchaser

Quintal
A unit of weight equal to 100 pounds

Quitclaim
A formal legal document discharging / releasing property, or transferring / relinquishing the seller's claim / interest in a property


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© Malcolm Bull 2017 / calderdale@aol.com
Revised 13:04 on 29th April 2017 / b113_q / 13