Todmorden & Lancashire


There is some confusion as to whether Todmorden is – or was – a part of Yorkshire or a part of Yorkshire.

Until 1st January 1888, the county border ran through the centre of Todmorden.

The original Yorkshire / Lancashire county boundary was a stream that ran through the town and under the Town Hall, it is now in a culvert. On the Town Hall pediment there is a dividing line showing the respective industries on each side of the line – bales of cotton on the Lancashire side, and bales of wool for Yorkshire.

Historically, the townships of Todmorden and Walsden were a part of the Lancashire parliamentary constituency, whilst Stansfield and Langfield were a part of the Yorkshire constituency.

Until 1832, Lancashire returned 2 Members of Parliament.

With the Reform Bill [1832], Lancashire was divided into 2 divisions: North and South. Todmorden and Walsden were a part of South Lancashire. Each division had 2 Members of Parliament.

In 1867, Lancashire was divided into 4 divisions: North, North-East, South-East and South-West. Todmorden and Walsden were a part of South-East Lancashire. Each division had 2 Members of Parliament.

In 1885, Lancashire was divided into 23 divisions. Todmorden and Walsden were a part of Middleton division of South-East Lancashire. Each division had 1 Member of Parliament.

Since 1885, a small part of the township of Cliviger has been a part of Clitheroe division of North-East Lancashire.

Stansfield and Langfield were a part of the West Riding [1832], a part of the North Division of the West Riding [1861 and 1867], and a part of the Sowerby Division [1885].

In 1910, the parishes of Cross Stone, Harley Wood and Cornholme were included in the Diocese of Wakefield. Those of Todmorden and Walsden were within the Lancashire Diocese of Manchester




© Malcolm Bull 2017 / calderdale@aol.com
Revised 10:09 on 3rd February 2017 / kk_157 / 6