Latin Mottoes & Texts


This Foldout collects some of the Latin and other texts which can be found in the district in datestones, epitaphs, documents, coats of arms, mottoes, and other inscriptions


aegyptianus
(Latin) Trans: gypsy

amicus humani generis
(Latin) Trans: friend of the human race

The trade mark of Ben Shaw & Sons Limited was the name Benjamin Shaw's signature surrounded by this Latin text

anno salutis
(Latin) Trans: in the year of our salvation

The phrase is often found in Monumental Inscriptions.

See AS

artium baccalaureus
(Latin) Trans: Bachelor of Arts.

The phrase is often found in Monumental Inscriptions.

See AB and BA

artium magister
(Latin) Trans: Master of Arts

The phrase is often found in Monumental Inscriptions.

See AM and MA

attornatus ad legem
(Latin) Trans: attorney at law

Clericus
(Latin) Trans: a clergyman, a clerk

See clicus

Clericus parochialis
(Latin) Trans: a parish clerk

Clicus
A form of the word clericus, a clerk

confide deo, diffide tibi
(Latin) Trans: Trust in God, Distrust thyself

This is one of the many inscriptions on High Sunderland, Halifax

contra vim mortis, non est medicamen in hortis
(Latin) Trans: There is no medicine in the garden against the power of death

An inscription at Wynteredge Hall, Hipperholme

decus et tutamen
(Latin) Trans: an ornament and a safeguard

From 1662, the milled edge of coins were engraved with this inscription.

The inscription reappeared when the £1 coin was issued in 1983

digni et vos este favore
(Latin) Trans: Be you also worthy of Favour

The Latin motto appears on Heath Grammar School Memorial Gates. It was written by Arthur Owen and is a pun on the surname of Dr John Favour, founder of the School

Doctrina Fortior Armis
(Latin) Trans: Learning is stronger than weapons

= The pen is mightier than the sword

This is the motto of Hipperholme Grammar School

dominus noster iesus christus
(Latin) Trans: our Lord Jesus Christ

The phrase is often found in Monumental Inscriptions.

See DNIC

dono dedit dedicavit
(Latin) Trans: given and dedicated as a gift

The phrase is often found in Monumental Inscriptions.

See DDD

fælix quem virtus ...
fælix quem virtus generosa exornat avorum, et qui virtute suis adjicit ipse decus

(Latin) Trans: happy is he whose ancestors make a profession of virtue, and who himself leaves virtue to succession

This is one of the many inscriptions on High Sunderland, Halifax

fama virtutum tuba perennis
(Latin) Trans: the fame of virtue is an eternal trump

This is one of the many inscriptions on High Sunderland, Halifax

garrulus insano crucietur ...
garrulus insano crucietur mundus amore, dum mea placide vita serena placet

(Latin) Trans: Let the chattering world be tortured by senseless love, While my calm life quietly pleases me

An inscription at Wynteredge Hall, Hipperholme

hic locus odit amat ...
hic locus odit amat punit conservat honorat. nequitiam pacem crimines jura probes

(Latin) Trans: This place hates, loves, punishes, observes, honours – Negligence, peace, crimes, laws, virtuous persons

This is one of the many inscriptions on High Sunderland, Halifax

hic sepultus est
(Latin) Trans: here is buried

The phrase is often found in Monumental Inscriptions.

See hse

hoc monumentum
(Latin) Trans: this monument

The phrase is often found in Monumental Inscriptions.

See hm

iesus hominum salvator
(Latin) Trans: Jesus, saviour of men

The phrase is often found in Monumental Inscriptions.

See ihs

ignorantia legis excusat neminem
(Latin) Trans: ignorance of the law excuses no-one

This inscription appears over the entrance to King Cross Police Sub-Station

jam mea, mox hujus, sed posthac nescio cujus
or nunc mea, mox hujus, sed posthac nescio cujus.

(Latin) Trans: now mine, once his, but afterwards I know not whose

This appears on the doorway at Sundial House, Friendly Fold and at Barkisland Hall

justum perficito nihil timeto
(Latin) Trans: act justly and fear nothing

In 1857, John Foster was granted armorial bearings with this motto.

It is the motto of Black Dyke Mills Band, and is displayed over the entrance to Cliffe Hill

justus propositi tenax
(Latin) Trans: a just (person) and true of purpose

This was the motto of the Lister family. It appears on the Lister family Arms and can be seen in the Housebody at Shibden Hall.

The motto was also adopted by William Busfeild when he changed his name

legum doctor
(Latin) Trans: doctor of laws

The phrase is often found in Monumental Inscriptions.

See Lld

maxima domus utilitas ...
maxima domus utilitas, et pernicies, ignes et lingua

(Latin) Trans: the house when large yields comfort; fires and tongues carry destruction with them

This is one of the many inscriptions on High Sunderland, Halifax

medicinae doctor
(Latin) Trans: doctor of medicine

The phrase is often found in Monumental Inscriptions.

See MD

meliora spero
(Latin) Trans: I hope for better [times]

An inscription at Wynteredge Hall, Hipperholme

monumentum posuit
(Latin) Trans: (he) placed (this monument)

The phrase is often found in Monumental Inscriptions.

See mp

nisi dominus custodierit civitatem
(Latin) Trans: Except the Lord keep the city

This is the Halifax motto and comes from the Biblical text:

Except the Lord keep the city, the watchman waketh but in vain

in Psalms 127:1

numquam hanc pulset portam qui violat sequum
(Latin) Trans: may no one who violates justice knock at this door

This is one of the many inscriptions on High Sunderland, Halifax

omnipotente facit stirps ...
omnipotente facit stirps sunderlandia sedes, incolat has placide et ineatur jura parentum lite racans, donec ductus, formica marines ebibat et totum testudo perambulet orbem:

(Latin) Trans: May the Almighty grant that the lineage of Sunderland may quietly inhabit this seat, and maintain the rights of their ancestors free from strife until an ant drink up the waters of the sea, and a tortoise walk around the whole world

This is one of the many inscriptions on High Sunderland, Halifax

patria domus ... optima caelus
(Latin) Trans: Heaven is the best [country, the best home]

2 inscriptions at High Sunderland, Halifax

piae memoriae
(Latin) Trans: to the pious memory

The phrase is often found in Monumental Inscriptions.

See pm

pone curavit
(Latin) Trans: (he) caused to be placed

The phrase is often found in Monumental Inscriptions.

See pc

Pro Bono Publico
(Latin) Trans: For the public good

An inscription on Hollin Well, Norland

Pro Placito Corone Celato

qui mihi discipulus puer es cupis atque
This is the first part of a verse from Carmen de Moribus, [Poem on how to behave] by William Lilly [1468-1522] High Master of St Paul's School, London
Qui mihi discipulus, puer, es cupis atque doceri,
Huc ades, haec animo concipe dicta tuo

Thou who art my pupil, boy, and desirest to be taught,
Come here, grasp these sayings with thy mind

This appears on the Heath School Seal and was incorporated into the badge on the pupils' uniform cap and blazer

quid non deo juvante
(Latin) Trans: What is not possible with God's help?

This appears on the gatehouse at Crow Nest, Lightcliffe

Quod Petis Umbra Est
(Latin) Trans: What You Seek is Shade

The inscription on a sundial [1833] at Ebenezer Baptist Church, Hebden Bridge

requiescat in pace
(Latin) Trans: may he rest in peace

The phrase is often found in Monumental Inscriptions.

See RIP

sacrum memoriae
or memoriae sacrum.

(Latin) Trans: sacred to the memory

The phrase is often found in Monumental Inscriptions.

See MS and sm

sanctae
(Latin) Trans: saints

The phrase is often found in Monumental Inscriptions.

See ss

sanctae theologiae baccalaureus
(Latin) Trans: Bachelor of Theology

The phrase is often found in Monumental Inscriptions.

See stb

sanctae theologiae professor
(Latin) Trans: Professor of Theology

The phrase is often found in Monumental Inscriptions.

See stp

sine prole
(Latin) Trans: without offspring

The phrase is often found in Monumental Inscriptions.

See sp

sine prole legitima
(Latin) Trans: without legitimate offspring

The phrase is often found in Monumental Inscriptions.

See spl

sine prole mascula
(Latin) Trans: without male offspring

The phrase is often found in Monumental Inscriptions.

See spm

suum cuique
(Latin) Trans: each according to his merit, to each his own

This was the trademark of James Simpson

tempus edax rerum
(Latin) Trans: time devours [all]

things This appears in the Smith Sundial, People's Park

ut hora sic vita
(Latin) Trans: as is the hour, so is life

A form of this text appears on a stone at Wood Top, Hebden Bridge




© Malcolm Bull 2017 / calderdale@aol.com
Revised 18:41 on 24th December 2017 / mml652 / 19