Pubs & inns

M



A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Machine Makers' Arms, Illingworth

In 1841, the Machine Makers' Arms and the White Lion, Illingworth were the venues for a meal when 400 people of the parish celebrated the victory over Napoleon and his exile to Elba

MacMillans, Wheatley
Long Lane. Formerly known as the Sporting Life

Maggie McFly's
Fountain Street. One of a sequence of pubs which occupied the former Halifax & Borough Club

Majestic Restaurant, Halifax
Market Street.

The pub closed in 1927

Malt House, Rishworth
270 Oldham Road

Malt Shovel, Ambler Thorn
Lane Top / Windy Bank


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Malt Shovel, Brighouse
18-19 Wakefield Road [1881] / 33 Wakefield Road [1901]. This was one of the first inns to operate under the terms of the Beerhouse Act [1830].

It was here that, in 1856, PC Greenwood, the second of Brighouse's policemen, arrested Dinsdale, an infamous poacher who had escaped from arrest in Halifax and had been on the run for 18 months.

The pub closed in 1972


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Malt Shovel, Coley
Aka Chapel House Inn.

Originally the Chapel House, Coley.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Malt Shovel, Elland
Briggate. Stands next to Britannia House.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs.

See Hemingway's Saddlers


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Malt Shovel, Halifax
2 Ann Street, Northgate. Built in 1629.

The landlord sold 2d tokens for admission to the pub's Music and Picture Gallery [1708].

The pub was demolished in 1824 and rebuilt further back when the road was widened.

The Inn still had the Music & Picture Gallery when Benjamin Milne was licensee [1850s].

The building appears in one of the prints by Joseph Rideal Smith.

In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the pub applied for, and was granted, a music and dancing licence.

The pub closed in 1913 and was demolished.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs

See J. & J. Baldwin, Brewers' Cellar, Halifax and Malt Shovel Yard, Halifax


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: J. H. Burgin
  • 1829: Jonathan Illingworth
  • 1834: John Riley
  • 1837: John Riley
  • 1845: John Crowther
  • 1850: Samuel Machin
  • 1852: Benjamin Milne
  • 1864: Benjamin Milne
  • 1881: Emma Pollard
  • 1894: Mrs Emma Pollard
  • 1887: Mrs E. A. Mallinson – [?]
  • 1891: Emma Pollard
  • 1901: William Taylor
  • 1903: Ms S. Taylor
  • 1905: Herbert Hadwen
  • 1911: Asa Robinson

 

Malt Shovel, Norwood Green


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1917: Ben Lee

 

Malt Shovel, Southowram
Halfpenny Can.

Built around 1780 to provide facilities for the quarry workers in the area.

Public concerts were held here.

In 1826, the Southowram Annual Subscription Concert was held here.

In 1837, Miss Susan Sykes took part in a concert here.

In 1856, the Southowram Floral & Horticultural Society held their first show here.

2 houses to the east of the pub were demolished in 1??? to widen the entrance to Cross Platts lane.

The pub closed in 2003.

In 2005, it was acquired by the Dharbar Indian Cuisine Company. Plans to convert in into an Indian restaurant were thwarted by local residents.

The building is currently [2008, 2013] boarded up. It is being refurbished [July 2014]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Malthouse, Rishworth
Formerly the Royal Hotel, Rishworth

Manchester House, Brighouse
42 Briggate.

It was owned by the Halifax Brewing Company), and then sold to Brear & Brown Limited [March 1898].

The pub closed in 1906 following the Licensing Act [1904].

Recorded in 1922


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1899: Owen Allen – [1850-1899] – who died suddenly
  • 1891: James Bottomley
  • 1905: John Ashworth
  • 1906: James Ashworth

 

Manhattan, Halifax
In the 1990s, the name of the Bull's Head, Halifax

Manor House, Southowram
Bank Top.

Recorded in 1822.

The pub closed in 2002, and was demolished in 2003.

The pub was said to be haunted.

Housing now occupies the site.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs.

See Sutcliffe's Court, Southowram


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Market Shades, Halifax
Market Street.

The pub closed in 1903

Market Tavern, Brighouse
Ship Street.

A new pub [2016] built on part of the Brighouse Market

Market Tavern, Halifax
Cow Green.

In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the pub applied for, but was refused, a music and dancing licence


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Marlborough, Elland


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1894: Mrs Frederick Brier

 

Marquis of Granby, Halifax
7-9 Copper Street / 10 Swine Market Aka Granby Inn. Opened in 1822.

The pub closed in 1897

See Buccaneer Inn, Halifax


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: James Maud
  • 1829: Joshua Murgatroyd
  • 1829: Eli Clegg
  • 1834: Eli Clegg
  • 1837: John Shields
  • 1841: Edward Foster – who was also a joiner builder
  • 1845: William Cass
  • 1850: William Smith
  • 1864: Ruth Garforth
  • 1874: William Newby
  • 18??: Edwin Murgatroyd

 

Marston's, Sowood
For a time, this was the name of the Airborne, Sowood [in 1???].

It reverted to the Airborne [in 1???]

Martin's Nest, Brighouse
199 Bradford Road.

Built in 1825 to serve the Bradford-Huddersfield Turnpike.

In 1891, Brear & Brown bought the property – which included 4 cottages – for £3310.

The pub closed in 2009?.

In July 2011, it became an Indian Restaurant.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See The Bedford family of Brighouse


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Martin's Nest, Elland
38 Quebec Street

Aka the Nest.

Opened in 18??.

It was a Webster's pub [1903].

The pub closed on 26th March 1999.

An industrial building now stands on the site


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Masons' Arms, Brighouse
Elland Road.

It has changed names several times:


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1869: John Chatburn
  • 1870: John Skelton

 

Masons' Arms, Elland
Jepson Lane, Westgate.

Owned by the Savile family of Rufford

It closed with extinction of licence [13th December 1919]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Masons' Arms, Elland
105 Lower Edge, Rastrick.

The pub closed on 14th February 1908 following the Licensing Act [1904].

It was a Stocks pub [until 1914]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Masons' Arms, Gauxholme
Bacup Road.

The Primitive Methodists held meetings in an upper room here. They later moved to Smithy Holme Mill


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Masons' Arms, Halifax
Woolshops


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Austin Pollard

 

Masons' Arms, Halifax
16 Bank Bottom. This is one of the beerhouses at Bank Bottom, Halifax


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1861: Joseph Holmes

 

Masons' Arms, Halifax

Masons' Arms, Todmorden
Blind Lane.

Recorded in 1891 and 1897 as the Free Masons' Arms Inn


Question: There seems to be some confusion between this hostelry and the Freemasons' Arms, Todmorden. Please email me if you can shed any light on this

 


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1881: Joshua Hawksworth – [1842-1881]
  • 1891: John Rowland
  • 1897: William Greenwood
  • 1905: William Haworth
  • 1908: John Townsend
  • 1981: Liz & Peter Jagger

 

Masons' Arms, Warley
Winterburn Lane.

It became the Winterburn.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two This was originally a beer house


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Maude's Temperance Hotel, Halifax
18 Broad Street.

Around 1874, Robert Maude kept the Temperance Hotel, Halifax

A 1900 advertisement for the business announced

For a Good Meal go to MAUDE'S TEMPERANCE HOTEL and Restaurant, Broad Street, Halifax.

Best Quality – Well Cooked – Nicely Served – Comfortable Rooms – Reasonable Prices.

Ordinary, Daily 1 o'clock,
Hot Dinners 12 to 2
Billiard Rooms, Comfortable Well-aired Beds

Proprietors: Thornton & Waterfall

See Broad Street Temperance Hotels

Maypole Inn, Warley
This was originally a farm-house and is recorded in 1773 as the Horns.

The maypole stood nearby and Warley Congregational Church opposite.

The pub may have been renamed around 1815 when the new maypole was erected.

The local rush-bearing ceremony starts here.

This is discussed in the books Halifax Pubs and Our Home & Country


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

McLouds, Halifax
Fountain Street. One of a sequence of pubs which occupied the former Halifax & Borough Club

Mechanics' Arms, Halifax
14 Smithy Street / Winding Road. This was originally a beer house.

The pub closed 1905


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1881: George Shaw – [aged 30]
  • 1891: Frank Crossley
  • 1905: William Saunders

 

Mechanics Arms, Todmorden
Shade. This was originally a beer house.

The pub closed in 1869

Mellor's Bar, Rastrick
Greenhead Lane

Mermaid, Sowerby Bridge
Old Causeway. Opened in 1701.

In 18??, the pub was renamed The Wharf Inn.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two

Merry Boys Inn, Northowram
1 Paddock / Cave Hill. This was originally a beer house


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1905: Esau Ambler
  • 1936: Oscar Chippendale

 

Mexborough's Arms, Elland
5 / 7 Westgate.

Formerly known as The Talbot. Opened on 18??. Named for Lord Mexborough who owned property in Elland.

The pub closed on 24th December 1927.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs

See Knights of the Golden Horn


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Milan's, Halifax
In what was originally the Salvation Army Men's Hostel & Metropole

Mile's Cross, Ovenden
Recorded on 4th October 1807, when the death was reported of Jonas Rushworth [1738-1807]
landlord for many years


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Milestone, Ripponden
In 200?, the Golden Lion, Ripponden changed its name

Mill Inn, Midgley
Brearley Mill


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Thomas Brown
  • 1834: Thomas Brown
  • 1845: Arthur Brown
  • 1861: Arthur Brown

 

Mill Inn, Mytholmroyd
In 18??, it was renamed The Clarence, Mytholmroyd

Mill, Mytholmroyd
Brearley. Opened in 1843.

The pub closed in 1923

Millbank Inn, Soyland
Mill Bank Road. Was originally the Anchor, Mill Bank.

It closed in 2010.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two

Miller & Carter
In 2016, the Three Nuns, Mirfield was inexplicably renamed the Miller & Carter

Miller's Arms, Halifax
Back Clarence Street


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Millers Bar, Brighouse
The 2016 manifestation of the Black Swan, Brighouse

Millers' Inn, Halifax
Back Clarence Street / 4 Gerrard Street [1851]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Millstone, Todmorden


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1861: George Elliott

 

Miners' Arms, Halifax
2 Bridge Street East, Cripplegate.

The pub closed in 1903


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Mitre, Halifax
7/13 New Market Street.

In January 1841, it was advertised


TO BE LET BY TICKET ... situate in Market Street and adjoining the Public Market ... with stabling for 16 horses ... now in the tenure of Mr Joseph Bottomley
 

It was owned by Michael Stocks [1860]. In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the pub applied for, and was granted, a music and dancing licence.

The inn was demolished in 1931 during the redevelopment of Woolshops

See Mitre Theatre, Halifax


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Moon Inn, Halifax
3 Smithy Street. This was originally a beer house. Stood next to the Sun Inn

The pub closed in 1905 following the Licensing Act [1904]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1871: John H. Foster – [aged 29]
  • 1881: John Murgatroyd
  • 1891: Eliza Stott
  • 1891: Eliza Stead
  • 1897: Thomas Gavan
  • 1905: T. H. Barrett

 

Moor Cock, Ovenden


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Moorcock, Hebden Bridge
Bridge Lanes.

The building was originally a size house for a Manchester textile company.

The beerhouse opened in 18??.

In February 1909, compensation was paid to the pub under the terms of the Licensing Act [1904]. They received £1,200 on 27th July 1909.

The pub closed in 19??. It was demolished in 19??


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1905: James Stott
  • 1910: John Heyworth

 

Moorcock, Norland
Moorbottom Lane.

It was a Webster pub.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1859: George Crowther
  • 1897: Walter Stafford
  • 1898: Walter Stafford
  • 1898: Edward Taylor
  • 1900: Edward Taylor
  • 1900: George Radcliffe
  • 1901: George Radcliffe
  • 1901: Thomas Oldfield
  • 1902: Thomas Oldfield
  • 1902: Henry Jackson
  • 1903: Henry Jackson
  • 1905: Henry Jackson
  • 1908: Henry Jackson
  • 1908: John Berry Fowler
  • 1909: John Berry Fowler
  • 1909: Thomas Scott
  • 1912: Thomas Scott
  • 1912: John Berry Fowler
  • 1925: John Berry Fowler
  • 1925: Wilfred Fleming
  • 1927: Wilfred Fleming
  • 1955: Wilfred Fleming

 

Moorcock, Sowerby
Sunny View. Opened in 1890.

At the Brewster Sessions in 1897, renewal of the licence was refused, Superintendent Weightman saying that

There was no necessity for the pub. It was high on the moors about Sowerby. There were no customers during the week, and business only seems to be done on Sundays. Men assembled for the purposes of gambling in the neighbourhood. Owing to the number of scouts which were stationed around, the police were powerless in the matter. After the gaming, the men would adjourn to the pub. The late tenant had been fined on 2 occasions for offences under the Licensing Act.

The pub closed about 1914


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Moorcock, Wainstalls
Moor Field Road. Late 17th century house. It was converted into a pub in 1??? This was originally a beer house.

It was a **IGNORE** pub [until 1961].

The pub closed [2002].

It is now private housing.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Moorcock, Walsden
Inchfield Moor. The remains of the pub can still be seen


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Moorings, Sowerby Bridge
Built round 1770. Originally West Warehouses Numbers 1 and 2 at Sowerby Bridge Canal Basin

Moorlands, Halifax
In 1984, the Peat Pitts, Bradshaw became a free house. After refurbishment, it became the Moorlands

Moulders' Arms, Halifax
22 Bank Bottom / Southowram Bank. This is one of the beerhouses at Bank Bottom, Halifax.

It closed in 1921 and was demolished.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Mount Inn, Halifax
29 Commercial Road. This was originally a beer house. Opened in 1845. In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the pub applied for, and was granted, a music and dancing licence.

The pub closed in 1967


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Mount Pleasant, Boothtown


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1864: Abraham Turner

 

Mount Skip, Wadsworth
Built in 1718 as a drovers' inn at Mount Skip. Chartist meetings were held at the inn.

Churn Milk Joan lived here.

The pub closed in 2000.

It is now a private house.

See Fanny and Elvis


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Mount Tavern, Boothtown
41 Haley Hill. This was originally a beer house.

The pub closed in 1915.

See Prince of Wales, Boothtown


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Moyles Hotel & Restaurant, Hebden Bridge
Successor to the Hebden Lodge Hotel at Croft Terrace

Murgatroyd's Arms, Luddenden
78 High Street. Opened in 1770.

Warley Urban District Council held meetings at the Murgatroyd's Arms until they acquired a Council room.

The pub closed in 1939.

The licence was transferred to the New Inn, Skircoat Green which then became the Murgatroyd Arms, Skircoat Green.

The building was bought by Luddenden Church and used for storage. It became known as Church House.

See Loyal Rose Lodge [No 808]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Murgatroyd Arms, Skircoat Green
The pub was known as the New Inn until 1939 when the licence was transferred here from the Murgatroyd's Arms, Luddenden and the name was changed

Museum, Stump Cross
Opened in 18?? This was originally a beer house.

The pub was originally the Delvers' Arms.

It is said that the pub was rebuilt at a higher level when the Godley Cutting and embankment were constructed in the 1820s.

The name was changed for a licensee who had an interest in taxidermy and kept a display of his stuffed animals in a room beneath the pub.

It was a Stocks pub.

The pub closed in 1998.

It stood derelict for many years by the cross-roads at Stump Cross.

In 2006-9, it was converted into flats.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Musical Arms, Sowerby Bridge
Wharf Street.

Formerly the Church Tavern. John Stansfield changed the name to the Musical Tavern or the Musical Arms

An advertisement of May 1856 announced

TO BE LET

The MUSICAL ARMS INN, Sowerby Bridge.

Further details from John Naylor, Brewer, Warley, Nr. Halifax

Musicians' Arms, Hebden Bridge
Market Street.

The pub closed in 1869


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


© Malcolm Bull 2018
Revised 09:45 /1st May 2018 / p200_m / 73618

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