Pubs & inns

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


R Popps, HalifaxRef 17-988
Lord Street

Raffles Night Club, MytholmroydRef 17-1183
Burnley Road. 1980s night club and restaurant in what was Scott's Café.

The building is now a Co-operative supermarket

Raggalds, QueensburyRef 17-168
Aka Old Raggalds, Raggles, Wraggles, and Wraggalds.

On June 27th 1852, Bell's London Life & Sporting Chronicle announced a game of knur & spell with John Jagger. Stakes were to be sent to Wraggles Inn

In 1995, 2 masked raiders attacked the pub, killing Michael Briggs and seriously wounding the licensee, David Baines and a customer John Paisley. Two Queensbury men were jailed for the shootings in December 1996. The pub then closed for a considerable time.

Raggald is a local term – from the Norse word for a villain or ruffian

See Bethel Parkinson and Raggalds Inn Bar


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Railway Hotel, BarkislandRef 17-833
The pub closed in 1906 following the Licensing Act [1904]

Railway Hotel, EllandRef 17-1134
Known as the Railway Hotel [1861 to 1881], it became the Station Hotel [1880s]

Railway Hotel, HalifaxRef 17-719
24/29 Horton Street. This Georgian building was originally a town house. In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the pub applied for, but was refused, a music and dancing licence.

It was a Ramsden pub [1904].

The Station Hotel was lower down Horton Street on Church Street.

See Crown Hotel, Halifax and Janet Currie


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1865: Harriet Boulton
  • 1871: Aquilla Helliwell
  • 1881: Harriet Boulton – [aged 55]
  • 1881: Harriet Boulton
  • 1891: Harriet Boulton
  • 1905: Fredrick William Crawford
  • 1906: Fredrick William Crawford
  • 1935: Fredrick William Crawford
  • 1935: John William Dewhirst
  • 1955: John William Dewhirst
  • 1955: Jack Calvert
  • 1956: Jack Calvert
  • 1956: Henry Neville Haigh
  • 1958: Henry Neville Haigh
  • 1958: William Patrick Armour Prendergast
  • 1959: William Patrick Armour Prendergast
  • 1959: Harold Anderson
  • 1960: Harold Anderson
  • 1960: Frank Athorn
  • 1961: Frank Athorn
  • 1961: James Stanley Foulds

 

Railway Hotel, HalifaxRef 17-870
Bowling Dyke.

The pub closed in 1905 following the Licensing Act [1904]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Railway Hotel, Hebden BridgeRef 17-581
New Road. Built in 1861. It served Hebden Bridge Railway Station.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Railway Hotel, LydgateRef 17-339
Burnley Road. It is now a private house.

See Cornholme Railway Station


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Railway Hotel, OvendenRef 17-1085
1-3 Nursery Lane / Ovenden Road.

This was originally a beer house.

This was a Brear & Brown Inn [1904], a Whitaker's [1917].

It was known as The Corner, on account of its position at the corner of Nursery Lane.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1881: Fergus Sutcliffe
  • 1891: William Henry Bairstow
  • 1894: William Henry Bairstow
  • 1894: John Halliday
  • 1905: John Halliday
  • 1910: John Halliday
  • 1910: James Helliwell
  • 1926: James Helliwell
  • 1926: Mrs Eliza Helliwell
  • 1926: Mrs Eliza Helliwell
  • 1926: William Riley
  • 1936: William Riley
  • 1937: William Riley
  • 1937: Fred Murgatroyd
  • 1942: Fred Murgatroyd
  • 1942: Mrs Vera Murgatroyd
  • 1946: Mrs Vera Murgatroyd
  • 1946: Fred Murgatroyd
  • 1946: Fred Murgatroyd
  • 1946: Wilfred Partridge

 

Railway Hotel, RastrickRef 17-169
11 Birds Royd Lane.

Served Brighouse Station. Built in 18??.

The Railway Brewery was here.

The pub closed in 1934.

It was later known as Pelico House


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Railway Hotel, RippondenRef 17-509
The Canterbury Inn was renamed the Railway Hotel when the nearby Ripponden Railway Station opened in 1878.

It was a Stocks pub [1906].

In 1906, it closed after its licence because it was

in bad repair and its customers were largely tramps and vagrants

It was demolished in 19??.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Railway Hotel, TodmordenRef 17-1273
In 1848, a new licence was granted for the sale of exciseable liquors was granted to William Barker for a house in Todmorden, now in the course of erection, and to be called The Railway Hotel


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1848: William Barker

 

Railway Hotel, WalsdenRef 17-938
545/7 Rochdale Road. It served Walsden Railway Station.

The pub closed in 1969.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Mr Whitworth


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1891: James Lord
  • 1905: Sutcliffe Fielden
  • 1917: Willie Taylor

 

Railway, WheatleyRef 17-1373
Recorded in 1922

Ram's Head, Sowerby BridgeRef 17-558
24/26 Wakefield Road. Built around 1800 to serve the workers on the Calder & Hebble Navigation.

It was recorded as a beerhouse [1875, 1881].

It was a Webster's pub [1939, 1947].

The Ryburn Brewery is run from the pub [2008].

The pub closed in 2010.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Ram Inn, RishworthRef 17-1407
Recorded on an early OS map.

It was near the entrance to what is now Green Withens Reservoir

Ramsden Wood, TodmordenRef 17-209

Rat, GreetlandRef 17-576
A popular name for the Druids Arms, Greetland.

The name is said to have originated in the 18th century when the landlord informed the excisemen about local illicit stills which were producing brandy and damaging his trade

Raven, KrumlinRef 17-602

Rawson's Arms, Elland Wood BottomRef 17-170
Park Road / Elland Wood Bottom / 13 Elland Road.

In 1903, the pub was owned by Webster's.

In 1989, a Monopolies & Mergers Commission ruling forced them to sell the pub. It was purchased by Ascot Estates which owned the pub until its closure in 2000.

The pub closed in 2000, and was converted into offices for W. T. Knowles & Sons.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Recruiting Serjeant, HalifaxRef 17-111
A notice in the Lancaster Gazette [20th July 1805] announced
On [8th July 1805], after a tedious widowhood of 3 months, Mrs Shaw, of the Recruiting Serjeant, Halifax [married] Mr Joseph Thwaite, joiner.

It is worthy of notice, that this enterprising and spirited heroine has had 3 living husbands in the long period of 3 years !!!

Red Lion Beerhouse, NorthowramRef 17-1325
Recorded in 1878, when the licence was
transferred to a newly-built house

Red Lion, BoothtownRef 17-720
1 Lee Lane / Ploughcroft Lane.

This was originally a beer house.

The name Red Lion appears in 1871.

It was a Whitaker pub [1904].

The pub burned down in 19??.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Red Lion, EllandRef 17-941
Stood in Church Street opposite Elland Church.

A timber building cased in stone. It was a coaching inn.

Recorded in 1719.

, when he married It was demolished in 19??

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1751: John Dyson
  • 1774: Ely Dyson
  • 1822: James Kitchen

 

Red Lion, HalifaxRef 17-1224
Winding Road. The pub had closed in the mid-1960s

Red Lion, HalifaxRef 17-835
6 Bank Bottom [1861] / 9 Bank Bottom. This is one of the beerhouses at Bank Bottom, Halifax.

Opened in 1853. The Inn was flooded in January 1866.

The pub closed in 1883


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Red Lion, LuddendenRef 17-959


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Thomas Senior

 

Red Lion, LuddendenfootRef 17-171
Aka Old Red Lion. Opened in 1811.

Branwell Brontë drank here when he worked at Luddendenfoot station.

The pub closed in 1877.

In 1879, it was demolished and replaced by the General Rawdon.

See Luddendenfoot Post Office


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1834: Susy Senior
  • 1845: John Eastwood
  • 1861: William Bedford
  • 1864: William F. Mitchell
  • 1874: William Greenwood

 

Red Lion, RastrickRef 17-172
Public concerts were held here.

It was later known as Thornhill Arms


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Red Lion, Sowerby BridgeRef 17-721
37 Wharf Street.

Planning applications show that this was a Ramsden pub [1900].

The pub closed in 1907 following the Licensing Act [1904].

It is mentioned again in 1924.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Red Lion, StainlandRef 17-1006
Sowood.

Aka Old Red Lion.

Owned by Bentley & Shaw of Lockwood.

On 7th February 1923, the licence was revoked


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Red Lion, StainlandRef 17-1063
Towngate.

It was a Stocks pub, then it was a Whitaker pub.

A music & dancing licence was granted [1939].

The pub was for sale at an asking price of £225,000 [2010].

The Travellers' Rest, Elland and the Bay Horse, Halifax were also up for sale after the owners, Deepclear Limited, went into administration [September 2010].

By 2013, it was painted white and renamed The Pub.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Abraham Haigh


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Red Lion, WykeRef 17-R1
Stands at Hellfire Crossroads.

The original Red Lion Pub stood near the Manor House.

In 1922, it was moved to its present site at the cross roads, in order to acquire more passing trade.

Later became Ruby's, then the Wyke Lion.

See Anthony Browne and Red Lion Viaduct


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Red Rooster, BrighouseRef 17-270
Brookfoot.

Until 1983, this was known as The Wharf

Redan, SoylandRef 17-834
At the junction of Blue Ball Road and Cross Wells Road.

The pub opened in 1890.

This was originally a beer house.

The pub was named for the Redan, the fortifications of the city of Sebastopol which were attacked by British on 8th September 1855, during the Crimean War.

The pub closed on 29th December 1936.

The building has been demolished


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Reed, HalifaxRef 17-173
44 Woolshops


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Reed, Sowerby BridgeRef 17-395
146 West Street. Opened in 1891.

Planning applications show that this was a Ramsden pub [1926].

It was a Halifax Brewery Company pub [1903, 1906], then it was an Alderson pub. The pub closed with the extinction of licence [29th December 1928]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Reindeer Beerhouse, HalifaxRef 17-1314
Crossfield. In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the Reindeer Hotel applied for, and was granted, a music and dancing licence.

Recorded on 7th October 1869, when there was a meeting of Halifax beersellers here

Reindeer Hotel, HalifaxRef 17-1174
7 John Street / Waterhouse Street.

This was originally a beer house


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Reservoir, Fly FlattsRef 17-725
Opened in 1865.

The pub closed in 1870.

See Fly Flatts Reservoir

Richard Oastler, BrighouseRef 17-1116
On 23rd November 1999, Park Methodist Chapel became the Richard Oastler pub.

There is no evidence that Richard Oastler had any connections with the Chapel

Richard's Temperance Hotel, HalifaxRef 17-1374
43 Horton Street.

Recorded in 1922

See Horton Street Temperance Hotels

Ridge Inn, AlcomdenRef 17-1072

See James Howarth

The Ridge, WadsworthRef 17-1400
Aka the Pack Horse, Wadsworth

Ridge, WiddopRef 17-999
The present [2017] inn sign suggests that the pub was recorded in 1610.

26th August 1902, Charles Baxter [aged 40], a blacksmith, was found unconscious on the floor of a barn adjoining the pub. He died the following day.

In 19??, the name was changed to the Pack Horse


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 18??: M. Barrett

 

Riggin, HubbertonRef 17-1392
A local name for the Shepherds' Rest, Sowerby

Ring O' Bells, BoothtownRef 17-1190
See New Ring O' Bells, Boothtown

Ring O' Bells, BrighouseRef 17-322
57 Commercial Street.

The pub was originally called the Staff of Life. The name was changed when a new peal of bells was installed at the St Martin's Parish Church in 1874.

The pub stood near the Wellington and closed in the 1960s when the area was redeveloped as a shopping precinct, Wellington Arcade.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Ring O' Bells, HalifaxRef 17-174
3 Upper Kirkgate.

Built in the 13th or 15th century.

It was previously known as the Sign of the Church

It is said that, during the 1600s, the cover of the Parish Church font was hidden in the pub in order to escape the depredations of Oliver Cromwell's men who strongly opposed any sign of decoration or ornamentation or statues and had removed the font itself.

In a corner of the cellar nearest the church, there is gravestone of 1635 cemented into a hollow. The inscription commemorates members of the Priestley family.

It was rebuilt in 1720.

Waterhouse's Almshouses stood immediately west next to the pub.

The inn is said to be haunted by a ghost – Walter or Wally – who has been seen by regulars at the pub. He stands by fire and there is the smell of a pipe being lit and smoked.

A number of other strange incidents have been reported including

  • A strong smell of burning
  • The heavy scent of old-fashioned lavender
  • Taps turning themselves on in the middle of the night, leaving water gushing in the upstairs basins in the morning
  • Switches turning themselves off

The cellars beneath the pub are said to lead to Halifax Parish Church.

The pub was up for sale [June 2010]

This is discussed in the book Sketches of Old Halifax

See Halifax Church Choir


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Ring O' Bells, MytholmroydRef 17-1089
Nest Lane. 17th century farm. It became a pub in 1???. It became a private house again in 1???

Ring O' Bells, RastrickRef 17-81
Lillands Lane. Opened in 18??.

The pub only sold ale, no spirits were served. Women were not allowed in the bar, and regulars were allowed to sit in the kitchen.

It was one of the last pubs to sell beer drawn straight from the wood.

The pub closed on 31st March 1961.

Along with neighbouring properties, it was demolished shortly afterwards.

See Albert Muir and The Fiddler


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Ring of Bells, EllandRef 17-729
Formerly Elland Castle. Recorded in 1826

Ringby House, NorthowramRef 17-1140


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1887: William Cordingley

 

Rising Sun, BoothtownRef 17-872
67 Haley Hill.

This was originally a beer house.

The pub closed in 1905 following the Licensing Act [1904]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1881: Thomas Siddall
  • 1894: John Buchanan
  • 1905: William Drake

 

Rising Sun, EllandRef 17-588
Jepson Lane.

The building was originally 2 cottages occupied by the minister and the caretaker of Jepson Lane Baptist Church.

The property became a public house between 1851 and 1861,

In 1902, the Inn was owned by Bentley & Shaw.

The original building was demolished around 1914 when the road was straightened for the new tram service, and a new pub was built – at a cost of £3,000 – using stone from Jepson Lane Baptist Church which had been demolished at the same time.

The pub closed in 2009. It is now [2010] a private dwelling


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Rising Sun, Luddenden DeanRef 17-832
Listed as Rising Sun Inn, Lower Slack, Warley [1881].

The pub closed in 1895


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Rising Sun, RastrickRef 17-335
22 Bridge End.

The pub stood in the middle of Bramston Street and opposite the Star.

It was known as a place for secret drinking!

The pub closed in 1907/8 following the Licensing Act [1904].

It was demolished in 1913.

Stone from the demolished pub was used to build Coronation Terrace in Bailiff Bridge and the boundary wall at Cooper Bridge Sewage Works.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Rising Sun, WainstallsRef 17-1377

See Sun Inn, Wainstalls

Robin Hood & Little John, CraggRef 17-447


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1834: Samuel Hinchliffe

 

Robin Hood, BrighouseRef 17-464
20/24 Wakefield Road / Wood Street / Phoenix Bridge.

This was originally a beer house.

On 4th July 1873, the road and houses in the vicinity of the pub were damaged by the bursting of a water main which had recently been installed.

The pub closed in 20??.

It and the adjoining Lodge were demolished to make way for a Lidl Supermarket [2017]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Robin Hood, Cragg ValeRef 17-175
Located in the area frequented by the Coiners.

On 27th June 1869, the landlord, Joseph Barrett, hit David Wilcock with a poker. Wilcock died from the head injuries, and Barrett was imprisoned for manslaughter.

In February 1909, compensation was paid to the pub under the terms of the Licensing Act [1904].

The pub closed in 199?. It reopened in 2001 when a group of locals – Merrymen Limited – banded together


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Robin Hood, Pecket WellRef 17-502
17th century coaching inn. Renovated in the mid-19th century. The doorway has carvings of 2 men in Lincoln Green and is inscribed
If Robin Hood be not at home come take a pot with little John

In 1830, the body of Thomas Townsend was displayed here.

On 30th October 1920, customers of the pub were injured in a charabanc accident at Oxenhope.

See Pecket Well Leek & Onion Club and Widdop Reservoir


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1830: Thomas Whiteley
  • 1845: William Roberts
  • 1864: Mrs Sarah Pearson
  • 1874: Mrs Sarah Pearson
  • 1897: Sutcliffe Sager
  • 1905: Mrs Susannah Sager
  • 1917: John Murgatroyd
  • 1920s: Mrs Sager [?]
  • 1925?: Mary & Ernest Thornton
  • 1929?: Mary & Ernest Thornton
  • 1970s: Mrs H. W. Pawson

 

Rock, SouthowramRef 17-409
45 New Street.

This was originally a beer house.

After Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee in 1887, the name was changed to the Jubilee Hotel.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Rock Tavern, EllandRef 17-325
Upper Edge / Dewsbury Road.

Owners and tenants have included

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Rock Tavern, Holywell GreenRef 17-722
Broad Carr, Holywell Brook.

Closed on 3rd September 2014. Then reopened under the ownership of the Andersen family [October 2025]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Roebuck, HalifaxRef 17-177
26/47/51 Northgate.

Aka The Buck.

Opened in 1735.

In 1864, it was bought by Samuel Webster.

The pub closed 10th September 1966.

See Coaches


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Roebuck, PortsmouthRef 17-893
Todmorden. Built around 1770.

The area was given the name Portsmouth by the son of landlord Thomas Clegg.

There was a bowling green at the pub in 1897 and this is still in use today.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 177?: Thomas Clegg
  • 1882: Thomas Sutcliffe – [1819-1882]
  • 1891: John Ashworth
  • 1897: Joseph Lord
  • 1905: Joseph Lord
  • 1917: Joseph Lord

 

Rook Hotel, HalifaxRef 17-591
166 Hanson Lane / 288 Queens Road


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Rook Tavern, SouthowramRef 17-1210


Question: Does anyone know exactly where the pub was located, or anything else about it?

 

This was originally a beer house


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1869: Mrs Bushey

 

Rope & Anchor, LangfieldRef 17-897
Aka the Anchor, Todmorden. 80/86 Roomfield Lane / 132 Halifax Road Todmorden [1901]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Ropers, HalifaxRef 17-836
11 Lee Bridge.

The pub closed in 1946

Rose & Crown, EllandRef 17-180
Northgate.

The building is dated 1682.

It was originally a U-plan house for the clergy at the Church.

In 1808, the Elland Church & King Society met here.

Records suggest that the pub reopened in 1834.

In 1858, it became a coaching inn.

There is a plaque – TJD 1890 – which commemorates the 21st birthday of Thomas John Dobson.

It was a Stocks pub [1895].

In 1900, it was advertised as

The Old Football Headquarters

It closed on 19th December 1914, because it stood close to several other pubs: the Savile Arms [which was 66 yards away], the Mexborough's Arms [100 yards away], the Blue Barrel [125 yards away], the New Inn [128 yards away], the Malt Shovel [150 yards away], the Wheat Sheaf [166 yards away], the Royal Hotel [175 yards away], the White Lion [176 yards away], and the Wellington [194 yards away], and the Rose & Crown was redundant.

The front was rendered over and a loading door was cut into the frontage so that it could be used as a warehouse by the wine and spirit merchants J. Townend & Sons.

In 1976, the company applied for permission to convert it into a single-storey building. It is a listed building and permission was refused. The building was refurbished and it was used as a pub or wine bar with various names including The Outside Inn, Benny's, Fakers, and De Lacys.

It is now [2007] empty and boarded up.

This is discussed in the books Halifax Pubs and Our Home & Country


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Rose & Crown, GreetlandRef 17-178
98 Rochdale Road.

Built about 1725. A fireplace is dated IN 1725.

The inn was owned by Elizabeth Townsend of Stones, Fixby [1895].

In March 1914, the Bridge Hotel, Greetland, the Rose & Crown and various dwelling houses were up for auction. The Rose & Crown was withdrawn.

It was an Ainley pub bought at auction in 1936

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs.

See Well Head Terrace, Greetland


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Rose & Crown, HalifaxRef 17-179
1-2 Cheapside / Southgate.

Opened in 1735.

Formerly known as The House at the Nook, the pub stood at the junction of Southgate and Cheapside.

It is said that Daniel Defoe wrote part of Robinson Crusoe whilst staying at the Inn.

David Moorhouse was a regular here.

It was a Whitaker pub [1925].

Marks & Spencer bought the pub from Richard Whitaker and it closed in 1956. The site was cleared in 1958 for their new larger store.

This is discussed in the books Halifax Antiquarian Society Transactions and Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Buffalo Bill, Fanny Lumb and Fanny Lumb


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Rose & Crown, HalifaxRef 17-61
Swine Market.

At the end of the 18th century, the name became the Cooper's Arms, and finally The Sportsman.

See Daniel Defoe

Rose & Crown, MixendenRef 17-1029
2 Mill Lane near Mixenden Bridge.

The pub has had several names, including

In 1845, there was a news room at the pub.

It was up for sale at £115,000 [November 2010].

In June 2012, there were proposals to convert the building back into 4 cottages.

The building is now [2015] private houses.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: William Horsfield
  • 1845: William Horsfield
  • 1861: Jonathan Garforth
  • 1861: Samuel Varley – who was also a farmer
  • 1864: Jonathan Garforth
  • 1871: Martha Parker
  • 1874: Martha Parker
  • 1881: Martha Parker
  • 1887: Job Hollingdrake
  • 1891: James Greenwood
  • 1894: Aaron Bradley
  • 1898: Ayrton Hey
  • 1904: Ayrton Hey
  • 1904: Ayrton Hey
  • 1904: Mrs Sarah Ann Hey
  • 1905: Mrs Sarah Ann Hey
  • 1916: Mrs Sarah Ann Hey
  • 1916: Lewis Hornshaw
  • 1917: Lewis Hornshaw
  • 1920: Lewis Hornshaw
  • 1920: Mrs Ellen Hornshaw
  • 1921: Mrs Ellen Hornshaw
  • 1921: Albert Hancock
  • 1922: Albert Hancock
  • 1922: Joseph Brakes
  • 1923: Joseph Brakes
  • 1923: Herbert Seston
  • 1927: Herbert Seston
  • 1927: William Garfitt
  • 1927: William Garfitt
  • 1927: George Frederick Webb
  • 1932: George Frederick Webb
  • 1932: John Stuart Fletcher
  • 1950: John Stuart Fletcher
  • 1950: Roden Heap
  • 1952: Roden Heap
  • 1952: Eric Barker
  • 1959: Eric Barker
  • 1959: Fred Haley
  • 1959: John Dowall Graham
  • 1959: John Dowall Graham
  • 1960: Dennis Murphy
  • 1961: John Clough
  • 1981: Dennis Murphy
  • 1981: Margaret & Ronnie Helliwell
  • 200?: Elizabeth Briggs

 

Rose & Crown, RippondenRef 17-406
Oldham Road.

This was originally a store of the Ripponden Co-operative Society Limited.

Opened in 1888.

In 1895, it was owned by Albion Brewery, Warley. It was acquired by the Halifax Brewing Company before 1903.

The pub closed in 1911 following the Licensing Act [1904]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Rose & Crown, SiddalRef 17-723
13 Siddal Street.

This was originally a beer house.

The licence was transferred from the Punch Bowl, Boothtown to the Rose & Crown [1st May 1957].

It was a Ramsden pub [1905].

The pub closed in 19??.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1871: William Brearley
  • 1874: William Brearley
  • 1881: George Henry Horsfall
  • 1891: Edwin Hainsworth
  • 1901: Benjamin Maud
  • 1907: Benjamin Maud
  • 1907: Thomas Maud
  • 1919: Thomas Maud
  • 1919: Frank Mansley
  • 1923: Frank Mansley
  • 1923: Sarah Mansley
  • 1924: Sarah Mansley
  • 1924: Harry Flather
  • 1939: Harry Flather
  • 1939: Harry Richardson
  • 1941: Harry Richardson
  • 1941: Sam Whitworth Taylor
  • 1949: Sam Whitworth Taylor
  • 1949: Frank Walton
  • 1950: Frank Walton
  • 1950: Robert Stephen Stonehouse
  • 1952: Robert Stephen Stonehouse
  • 1952: John James Bright
  • 1953: John James Bright
  • 1953: Walter Hodgson
  • 1955: Fred Bullock
  • 1955: Walter Hodgson

 

Rose & Crown, StainlandRef 17-181
High Street / Castle Clough.

See Abraham Haigh


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Rose & Crown, StansfieldRef 17-R129
Castle Clough / Halifax Road. A pub is recorded here in the early 19th century.

The present mid 18th century building was originally 2 cottages.

Cinderhills Mill stood next door.

It was boarded up [2004]. It later reopened as Big D's. It was again boarded up [August 2011]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1845: Mary Greenwood
  • 1854: Samuel Law
  • 1867: Samuel Law
  • 1891: Mary Uttley
  • 1896: Fred Hirst
  • 1900: Fred Hirst

 

Rose & Crown, TodmordenRef 17-1153
Lydgate


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Rose & Crown, TodmordenRef 17-1154
Millwood.

The Court Sublime Lodge of the Royal Foresters met at the pub [until 1893].

In 1894, the Sutcliffe family sold the pub to Whitaker's.

It is now [2017] a private house.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Rose & Crown, WarleyRef 17-338
35 Cote Hill.

Opened in The City, Cote Hill [1874].

This was originally a beer house.

The pub closed on 28th January 1941 and was demolished later that year.

Sheltered flats for old people were built on the site.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs

See Rose & Crown Yard, Warley


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Rosie O'Grady's, HalifaxRef 17-1301
A later manifestation of the Victory Lounge, Halifax

Round House, BrighouseRef 17-317
2 Clifton Road / King Street. Aka the Roundabout House, the Oddfellows' Arms.

Built in 1831.

Only a part of the building is circular. The rear domestic part is square.

It was one of the first inns to operate under the terms of the Beerhouse Act [1830].

It is said to be haunted by a ghost called Walter who had committed suicide in the cells of the Brighouse Magistrates Court which was nearby.

It was later called the Round Tavern.

The pub closed in 2000 and is now offices.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Roundhill, RastrickRef 17-559
Clough Lane.

Named for the Round Hill at Rastrick.

It was a Whitaker pub [1896].

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Royal Engineers, BrighouseRef 17-837
Aka The Engineers'.

This was originally a beer house at 2 Hangram Street, on the corner of Hangram Street and 36 Bradford

Road. Opened in 18??.

The pub closed on 5th April 1965.

The building was subsequently occupied by a print-shop


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Royal George, EllandRef 17-5182
22 Southgate.

Opened in 18??.

The pub closed with extinction of licence [21st December 1912].

The building was subsequently used as shops and stores.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Royal George, MidgleyRef 17-392
Lydgate / Towngate.

Recorded in 1881.

The pub closed in 1919.

It was mentioned again in 1924


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Royal George, TodmordenRef 17-1339
17 Rochdale Road / Church Street.

Built by John Howarth [late 1700s]. The Inn was held successively by several generations of his family.

It was a Webster's pub.

See Eccles's Fold


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Royal George, TodmordenRef 17-182
351 Halifax Road / Castle Street.

The Inn was owned by the Kirkstall Brewery, Leeds and was sold to the Salford Brewery, Blackburn in 1943

The pub acquired a full licence on 6th March 1958.

See Eccles's Fold


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1837: John Marshall
  • 1842: James Sykes
  • 1845: James Sykes
  • 1847: James Sykes
  • 1861: John Mitchell
  • 1891: Ann Dean
  • 1891: William Stewart Dennett
  • 1893: William Stewart Dennett
  • 1905: J. B. Gledhill
  • 1936: John Harker
  • 1937: John Harker
  • 1937: John William King
  • 1945: John William King
  • 1945: Harold Butterworth
  • 1947: Harold Butterworth
  • 1947: James Grundy
  • 1948: James Grundy
  • 1948: Florence Elizabeth Sutcliffe
  • 1955: Florence Elizabeth Sutcliffe
  • 1955: William Walsh
  • 1956: William Walsh
  • 1956: Colin Benson
  • 1957: Colin Benson
  • 1957: William Henry Robinson
  • 1959: William Henry Robinson
  • 1959: Robert A. G. Oliver
  • 1959: Joyce Evelyn Walker
  • 1960: Joyce Evelyn Walker
  • 1960: Stephen Thomas Riley
  • 1962: Stephen Thomas Riley
  • 1962: Robert Kershaw Greenwood

 

Royal Hotel & Oddfellows' Hall, HalifaxRef 17-183
Victoria Street / 19-21 St James's Road.

Opened in 1863. In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the Hall applied for, and was granted, a music and dancing licence.

The pub closed in 1962.

The building was demolished in 1963.

The Hotel is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Halifax Chess Club, Oddfellows' Hall, Halifax and Stansfield Concerts


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Royal Hotel, BrighouseRef 17-186
Stood at 1 Huddersfield Road and the junction with Mill Lane.

Built in 1839 for Brighouse Railway Station.

The Brighouse Rangers had their headquarters here.

The pub was used to treat those injured during the 1882 riots, with one room used for the Irish lads who had been beaten up, another for the local lads who had beaten them up, and a third for the police who were trying to keep them apart.

In 18??, Rev Benjamin Firth bought the pub.

The pub was demolished in 1973 to make way for the new road layout.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Brighouse Cycling Club, Brighouse Sewering, Drainage & Lighting Bill [1845], William Francis Job and Tom Yeadon


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Royal Hotel, EllandRef 17-5184
Briggate / Elland Bridge.

The building was designed by W. H. Crossland [1865].

It stands next to what is now Britannia House

In March 1864, an advertisement appeared in the Halifax Guardian inviting


tenders for quarrying of stone on a site adjacent to the Crown & Anchor Inn, and tenders for the construction of the new Royal appeared at the same time
 

The Royal backs on to a quarry face.

It was a Stocks pub [1914].

Now called The Bridge.

The adjacent shops and houses to the west are believed to have been designed by W. H. Crossland in 1865.

It is now [2015] occupied by Wellbeing Centres – Elland.

See Savile [No 1231] Masonic Lodge


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1871: John Tweed
  • 1874: John Tweed
  • 1881: John Wood
  • 1887: James Sunderland
  • 1887: Mrs Eliza Smith
  • 1891: William Hanson
  • 1894: Joseph F. Crossley
  • 1897: Fred Tasker
  • 1901: Matthew Ward
  • 1901: Matthew Ward
  • 1903: Ben Smith
  • 1903: Ben Smith
  • 1903: William Bottomley Bennett
  • 1903: William Bottomley Bennett
  • 1903: John Henry Walton
  • 1906: John Henry Walton
  • 1906: Albert Dugdale
  • 1909: Albert Dugdale
  • 1909: Helliwell Firth
  • 1911: Helliwell Firth
  • 1911: Fred Helliwell
  • 1914: Fred Helliwell
  • 1914: Albert France
  • 1919: Albert France
  • 1919: David Lewis Aspinall
  • 1922: David Lewis Aspinall
  • 1922: Willie Stayton
  • 1924: Willie Stayton
  • 1924: Thomas Wragg
  • 1939: Thomas Wragg
  • 1939: Florence Wragg
  • 1946: Florence Wragg
  • 1946: William Alfred Walker Robinson

 

Royal Hotel, HalifaxRef 17-1267
Victoria Street


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1894: Frank Walton
  • 1917: Lewis Wormald

 

Royal Hotel, HalifaxRef 17-724
31-33 Hall Street.

This was originally a beer house.

Opened in 1815.

The pub closed in 1969


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1882: John Harris
  • 1905: Willie Clay
  • 1917: Lewis Wormald
  • 1936: James Binns

 

Royal Hotel, HalifaxRef 17-996
Bowling Dyke


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1894: R. Whitworth

 

Royal Hotel, RishworthRef 17-184
Oldham Road.

Built around 1799 for the turnpike, and originally known as the King's Arms.

Around 1845, Isaac Kershaw changed the name to the Royal Hotel

Rishworth Council meetings were held here [18??].

The Inn was owned by John Wilkinson Hoyle Wheelwright [1893] when he left estate valued at £91260 9/9d. The Inn remained in the Estate until it was sold on the 19th Jun 1920 to Louisa [61-23] & Mary Crowther [61-22].

In 200?, it became The Malthouse.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs

See Memories of Pubs in Rishworth


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Royal Hotel, Sowerby BridgeRef 17-185
1 Sowerby Street / 2 West Street. Hotel built around 1850 for travellers on the new railway and Sowerby Bridge Railway Station.

It is a flat-iron building prominently situated at the junction of West Street and Sowerby Street.

It was called The Royal Commercial & Family Hotel & Posting House and The Royal Commercial Inn & Posting House [1861].

It was a Stocks pub [1898, 1938, 1940].

Planning applications show that this was a Stocks pub [1923].

It is now 11 private apartments known as The Royal Loft

This is discussed in the books Halifax Pubs and Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Ancient Order of Foresters, Crimean War and Royal Hotel Livery Stables


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Royal Oak, Ambler ThornRef 17-560
Shibden Head Lane.

This was originally a beer house.

It was a Stocks pub [1914].

See Ambler Thorn Methodist Chapel


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1861: Rebecca Saville
  • 1871: Jonas Woodhead
  • 1887: Jonas Woodhead
  • 1887: Edward Clark
  • 1895: Edward Clark
  • 1895: Josiah Mitchell
  • 1897: Josiah Mitchell
  • 1897: Albert Holt
  • 1898: Albert Holt
  • 1898: Christmas Staff
  • 1899: Christmas Staff
  • 1899: Harry Pilling
  • 1901: Harry Pilling
  • 1902: Harry Pilling
  • 1902: John Tidswell
  • 1906: John Tidswell
  • 1906: Harry Batty
  • 1914: Harry Batty
  • 1914: George Rhodes
  • 1915: Clara Rhodes
  • 1915: Clara Rhodes
  • 1915: George Rhodes
  • 1915: George Rhodes – who enlisted
  • 1925: Clara Rhodes
  • 1925: Cyril Atkinson
  • 1927: Cyril Atkinson
  • 1927: William Smith
  • 1932: William Smith
  • 1932: Fred Thorp
  • 1936: Fred Thorp
  • 1936: William Webber
  • 1937: William Webber
  • 1937: Lister Tattersall
  • 1952: Lister Tattersall
  • 1952: James Bulman
  • 1957: James Bulman
  • 1957: Fred Barron

 

Royal Oak, BarkislandRef 17-1024
In 1881, when Mary Hey and her children lived at the Royal Oak Inn, it was not operating as an Inn.

Later, it was known as Clayhouse Farm, Barkisland


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1861: Dan Whiteley
  • 1864: David Whiteley

 

Royal Oak, BrighouseRef 17-418
7 Commercial Street.

The pub closed in 1936


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Royal Oak, ClaremountRef 17-727
7 Primrose Street, Akroydon.

This was originally a beer house


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Royal Oak, EllandRef 17-190
Lower Edge Road.

In August 1877, Webster's bought the pub from William Monks.

It was owned by John Ainley & Sons Limited.

It is now [2014] a private house.

See Lower Edge Bowling Club


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Joshua Lumb
  • 1834: Joshua Lumb
  • 1845: Martha Lumb
  • 1853: Mr Lumb
  • 1861: Joseph Brook
  • 1866: Joseph Brook
  • 1874: Samuel Steward
  • 1881: Sarah Steward
  • 1894: Mrs Sarah Steward
  • 1903: James Spencer
  • 1905: Herbert Wood
  • 1907: Josiah Lockwood
  • 1907: John William Shaw
  • 1909: Thomas Jackson
  • 1910: Thomas Jackson
  • 1911: Willie Denham
  • 1913: Joah Green
  • 1916: Joah Green
  • 1917: Joah Green
  • 1917: George Henry Rushton
  • 1917: Sarah Ellen Rushton
  • 1928: Percy Hollingsworth
  • 1932: Dennis Harrison
  • 1937: John Simmons Pearson
  • 1941: Wilfred Leadbetter
  • 1946: Wilfred Leadbetter
  • 1946: Susannah Leadbetter
  • 1948: Susannah Leadbetter
  • 1948: Harold Healey
  • 1968: Harold Healey

 

Royal Oak, HalifaxRef 17-189
1 Clare Road / 1 New Road / Ward's End.

A coaching inn built in 1??? originally stood on the site.

In 1789, Signior Petro, an Italian performer stayed at the Inn.

A milestone outside the pub records

To London 198
To Huddersfield 7

In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the pub applied for, and was granted, a music and dancing licence.

It was a Knowles pub.

In 1929, the building was demolished and rebuilt for Ramsden's Brewery by Jackson & Fox using materials taken from the wooden frigate HMS Newcastle which was built in 1860, converted to a powder hulk in 1889 and sold in 1929.

The new pub opened on 30th July 1931.

The exterior includes two corbels and a door jamb [of 1931] by Harry Percy Jackson.

There are gents' urinals from Oates & Green.

The pub has had a succession of name changes: the Tap & Spile; The Royal Oak again; Dirty Dick's.

There are several ghosts linked to the pub

  • The son of the last landlord before the pub was demolished [1929] who died after his clothes were set alight by sparks from the pub fire
  • A woman in Puritan dress
  • A seaman who was killed whilst moving gunpowder on board HMS Newcastle

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Royal Oak, Hebden BridgeRef 17-1081


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1853: Mrs Harriet Taylor – [1790-1853]

 

Royal Oak, King CrossRef 17-728
126 Haugh Shaw Road / Paradise Row / Whitehead's Buildings.

This was originally a beer house.

It was a Ramsden pub.

It was demolished in the 1970s when Aachen Way was constructed.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs.

See Royal Oak Smoke Club, King Cross


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1870: Thomas Hutchinson
  • 1871: Thomas Hutchinson
  • 1881: Charles Crowther – [aged 46]
  • 1891: William Henry Wadsworth
  • 1901: William Henry Wadsworth
  • 1901: George Woods
  • 1911: George Woods
  • 1911: Samuel Crossley
  • 1922: Samuel Crossley
  • 1922: Annie Crossley
  • 1927: Annie Crossley
  • 1927: Fred Squire
  • 1936: Fred Squire
  • 1946: Fred Squire
  • 1946: Francis Osbourne Ramsey
  • 1950: Francis Osbourne Ramsey
  • 1950: Frank Whittmore
  • 1955: Frank Whittmore
  • 1955: Farrar Baldwin
  • 1956: Farrar Baldwin
  • 1956: John Stack
  • 1959: John Stack
  • 1959: Wilfred England
  • 1961: Wilfred England
  • 1961: Robert Gillan
  • 1963: Robert Gillan
  • 1963: Joseph Gordon Farnell
  • 1963: Joseph Gordon Farnell
  • 1963: Harry Hamer

 

Royal Oak, LuddendenfootRef 17-1158
Acre Lane


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Royal Oak, MidgleyRef 17-187
See Pismire Hill, Mytholmroyd


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Royal Oak, MytholmroydRef 17-952
Burnley Road.

It was a Brear & Brown pub [1897].

The pub closed in the 1970s.

For some time, it was boarded-up and delapidated. An enforcement order was served on the owner to develop the site.

In 2004, it was converted into flats and the original frontage retained.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Royal Oak, SowerbyRef 17-905


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Hannah Bates

 

Royal Oak, Sowerby BridgeRef 17-191
West Street / 56 Sowerby Street.

The inn sign displays the name Top O' T' Street.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Royal Oak, StainlandRef 17-188
6 Holywell Green / Burrwood. Opened in 1834.

It was a Stocks pub [1895].

It is now a private house: Royal Oak House


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Royal Oak, TodmordenRef 17-953
505 Springside. Recorded in 1897


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Royal, Pye NestRef 17-359
Upper Washer Lane.

J. E. Wainhouse's home at West Air was converted into a pub, known successively as the Royal, Pye Nest, the Folly, and the Wainhouse Tavern [by 2014]

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs

Royal Sovereigns, HalifaxRef 17-193
21 Northgate / North Bridge.

Opened in 1822. In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the pub applied for, and was granted, a music and dancing licence.

The pub closed in 1910 following the Licensing Act [1904]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1829: Thomas Atkinson
  • 1834: Thomas Atkinson
  • 1837: James Holt

 

Ruby's, WykeRef 17-R2
Formerly the Red Lion at Hellfire crossroads.

In 2003, it was refurbished as the Wyke Lion

Running Man, HalifaxRef 17-R91
Pellon Lane. Replaced The Dusty Miller when it opened in June 1971.

Named for a felon called John Lacey who was known as the Running Man because he escaped punishment under the Gibbet Law by running beyond the town boundary.

An apparition of the decapitated Lacey has been reported at the inn.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

Rushcart, SowerbyRef 17-561
Sowerby Green. Formerly The Star.

The Rushbearing procession calls here.

A portrait of former landlord John Whiteley is said to be the source of supernatural happenings


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


© Malcolm Bull 2019
Revised 11:57 /15th September 2019 / p200_r / 193696

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