Pubs & inns

S



A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Saddle, HalifaxRef 17-194
12 Market Street / Russell Street. Opened in 1819.

An advertisement for the business in The Leeds Mercury of 3rd August 1833 announced

Sale by Auction

That old-established & well-accustomed PUBLIC HOUSE, known by the Sign of the SADDLE INN, Halifax, together with the adjoining premises, viz. the HOUSE and PRINTING-OFFICE occupied many years by the late Mr Jacobs.

Also the several BUTCHERS' SHOPS and TENEMENTS thereto belonging with every Convenience and Privilege attached.

This is an eligible Opportunity for the profitable investment of Capital, the Premises being situated in the Centre of one of the most thriving Towns in the West-Riding

In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the pub applied for, and was granted, a music and dancing licence.

In 1896, it was demolished and a new building was incorporated into the new Halifax Borough Market.

A promotional card for the Hotel announced


SADDLE HOTEL, HALIFAX

HEADQUARTERS OF THE
HALIFAX FLYING CLUB, HALIFAX CANINE SOCIETY,
Farmer's Association. Boot and Shoe. Blacksmiths.

ODDFELLOWS Glory Lodge,
Widow's Repose, Good Samaritans.

Large Assembly Room. Seating accommodation for 140.
Large and small Parties catered for. Tel. 3629

Halifax Town AFC was founded at a meeting here on 23rd May 1911.

It was a Brear & Brown pub [1913].

The pub closed in 1966.

A Lipton's store occupied the building for a time.

When the building was demolished [1960s], it was replaced by a modern building, and this has been successively occupied by

  • Electricity Showrooms
  • JJB Sports
  • Heron Foods [2013]

There is a Blue Plaque on the building remembering that the Halifax Town AFC was founded at a meeting here.

See Ancient Order of Foresters, A. J. Farnell and Lister Gibson


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Saint Crispin, HalifaxRef 17-S197
6 Causeway, Winding Road / King Street. Aka Crispin Inn, Crispin Hotel. The Inn was situated at the junction of Causeway, King Street and Winding Road, near Halifax Parish Church.

It was named for the Patron St of Shoemakers.

The inn and John Wood's Cropping Shop in Huddersfield were the headquarters of local Luddites. The inn was the scene of an important Luddite meeting in March, 1812 where it was decided to attack William Cartwright's mill at Rawfolds and other mills.

The inn was demolished in 1844, and the Old Crispin Inn erected on the site

See Crispin, Halifax, Old Crispin, Halifax, St Crispin Republican Club and Upper Crispin, Halifax


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Salvation, HalifaxRef 17-1331
Barum Top.

The former Comet store at Barum Top became a pub, known successively as the Barcentro, Halifax, the Barracuda [February 2002], and the Salvation [2013]

Savile Arms, EllandRef 17-195
Westgate.

Built in 1748.

Elland Cross stood near the Hotel.

There is an earlier carved stone tablet with the Savile coat of arms, the motto

Be Fast

and the date 1748.

In 1895, the pub was owned by Baron John Savile of Rufford Abbey.

On 16th May 1922, his nephew John Savile Lumley-Savile, the 2nd Baron, sold the inn to Webster's

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs.

See Britannia House and Elland Window Cleaning Company


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Savile's Arms, ThornhillRef 17-942


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Richard Lodge

 

Scarborough CastleRef 17-1019
Crown Street, Halifax. Recorded 1775-1887.

See Scarborough Castle

Scout Head, MidgleyRef 17-847
Scout Head. Opened in 1767.

The pub closed in 1932

Second Best, HalifaxRef 17-381
In 1983, the Allan Fold, Halifax was renamed Second Best. In 1986, it reverted to Allan Fold

Sett Hill, HalifaxRef 17-1279
6 Southowram Bank


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1901: Edward Hirst

 

Seven Stars, HalifaxRef 17-1092
Back Lane.

Recorded in 1735.

On 21st July 1868, the Inn and adjoining shops were demolished for Bull Green improvement

Shade, HeptonstallRef 17-412
Lower Smithy / Smithy Lane.

Closed in 19??.

The building was bought by Halifax Corporation and converted into housing for those working on nearby Widdop Reservoir


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Shades, HalifaxRef 17-1303
A hostelry identified as
The Shades at the Granby

was described by magistrates as

a frightful source of great disorder

in the Annual Brewster Sessions [1860]

Shakespeare, HalifaxRef 17-196
Horton Street / 2 Ward's End.

The name is spelled in various ways, including Shakspear Hotel [1874].

The original Shakespeare Hotel was on Southgate adjacent to, and north of, the old Theatre Royal.

Theatregoers could reach the Hotel without going outside. There was also a passage connecting the theatre and the pub and this was known as Ammonia Avenue

In July 1857, the pub was advertised


To Be Let.

That old-established INN situate close to the Theatre and other
public buildings, with the right of brewing,

Satisfactory reasons given for leaving

The 2 properties were demolished. The new Shakespeare was built round the corner in Horton Street and opened in 1903. The new Theatre Royal was built, occupying the whole site, and opened on 4th August 1905.

The property is now [March 2014] known as the Romeo & Juliet.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Magistrates' Office, Halifax and Shakespeare Street, Halifax


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Shamrock, HalifaxRef 17-449
37 Gaol Lane / Winding Road.

This was originally a beer house.

The pub opened in 1869.

It was a Whitaker pub [1905].

The pub closed in 1954.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Shannon & Chesapeake, StansfieldRef 17-197
Millwood Lane.

Built around 1817.

The pub was named for the sea battle off Boston, Massachusetts, during the War of 1812, in which the British HMS Shannon captured the American USS Chesapeake on 1st June 1813.

It was a Whitaker pub [1894].

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1845: Margaret Clegg
  • 1861: James Marshall
  • 1891: Lawrence Eastwood
  • 1900: Arthur Hirst
  • 1905: Benjamin Howorth
  • 1917: John Gledhill

 

Shant, HolmfieldRef 17-487
Shay Lane. Originally known as the Station Hotel, this was a popular local name for the pub

Shay Hotel, HalifaxRef 17-562
Hunger Hill.

Designed by Glendinning & Hanson.

Opened in 1928.

On 18th April 1928, the licences were transferred from the T' Cat i' th' Window, Halifax and the Flying Horse, Halifax, to the new Shay Hotel.

It was a Ramsden pub.

In December 2011, the Hotel was demolished


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1928: Percy Emmett
  • 1935: Percy Emmett
  • 1935: Robert Cyril Ramsden
  • 1937: Robert Cyril Ramsden
  • 1037: Arnold Philip Shackleton
  • 1940: Arnold Philip Shackleton
  • 1940: William Dewhirst
  • 1944: William Dewhirst
  • 1944: Samuel Greenwood
  • 1945: Samuel Greenwood
  • 1945: William Henry Nicholson
  • 1947: William Henry Nicholson
  • 1947: Thomas Whitaker
  • 1948: Thomas Whitaker
  • 1948: Raymond Wilks
  • 1950: Raymond Wilks
  • 1950: Harold Wilson
  • 1952: Harold Wilson
  • 1952: Bertram Frederick Tucker
  • 1953: Bertram Frederick Tucker
  • 1953: Alfred Taylor
  • 1960: Alfred Taylor
  • 1960: Frank Albert Malkin
  • 1961: Frank Albert Malkin
  • 1961: Bernard Charles Frank Waddell
  • 1962: Bernard Charles Frank Waddell
  • 1962: Keith Townend Balford

 

Shears, GreetlandRef 17-198
Brow Bridge.

Originally a shop. It became a pub in 18??. It was demolished in 1865

There is some confusion between this pub and the Shears, West Vale


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Mary Crossland
  • 1834: Joseph Mann
  • 1845: Joseph Mann

 

Shears, HalifaxRef 17-199
1 Paris Gates, Shaw Lane.

This was originally a beer house.

It was a Brear & Brown pub [1905], and a Whitaker pub [1917].

In 1888, this and the New Inn, Holdsworth Street were sold by Clement Holdsworth.

This is discussed in the books Halifax Pubs and Sketches of Old Halifax


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Mrs Dinah Whitaker
  • 1823: Mrs Dinah Whitaker
  • 1845: John Ingham
  • 1861: William Bentley
  • 1871: Robert Fielding
  • 1877: Robert Fielding
  • 1877: Mrs Sarah Fielding
  • 1887: Mrs Sarah Fielding
  • 1895: Mrs Riley
  • 1901: Dyson Hepworth
  • 1905: Dyson Hepworth
  • 1905: Jabez Binns
  • 1906: Jabez Binns
  • 1906: Jonas Empsall Tyas
  • 1907: Jonas Empsall Tyas
  • 1907: Mrs Jane Field
  • 1926: Mrs Jane Field
  • 1926: Ernest Henry Taylor
  • 1931: Ernest Henry Taylor
  • 1931: Sam Walker
  • 1932: Sam Walker
  • 1932: Charles Ingham
  • 1940: Charles Ingham
  • 1940: James Fahy
  • 1942: James Fahy
  • 1942: Alfred Arthur Foden
  • 1944: Alfred Arthur Foden
  • 1944: Walter Robertshaw
  • 1945: Walter Robertshaw
  • 1945: George Hoyle
  • 1954: George Hoyle
  • 1954: Harold Collins

 

Shears, HalifaxRef 17-200
Lee Bridge. Recorded in 1822.

It was a Stocks pub [1903].

It was rebuilt in 1904.

In 1987, it became Dean Clough Inn.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Shears, West ValeRef 17-S64
8 Stainland Road.

The public house stood on the site of a 16th farm originally known as Lambert House

It was listed as Lambert Hall [1841], Lambert House [1851].

In 1902, the inn was owned by Martha Bowers of Rochdale Road, West Vale.

There is some confusion between this pub and the Shears, Greetland.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs.

The building was demolished and a Co-Op store built on the site [2012].

During the demolition, no cellars were found in the building.

Before the redevelopment, the outline of the original Shears Inn could be seen as a white shape on the end wall of 6a Stainland Road, West Vale.

See Greetland Local Board and Junction, West Vale


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Shepherds' Inn, TodmordenRef 17-1155
371 Halifax Road, Lob Mill.

This was originally a beer house.

Woodhouse Football Club had their dressing rooms here [1888]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1837: Robert Dearden
  • 1847: Robert Dearden
  • 1861: Mrs Sarah Dearden
  • 1881: William Houlden – [1831-1881]
  • 1893: Mrs Sarah Ann Houlden
  • 1900: Walter Hooson
  • 1905: John Barker

 

Shepherds' Rest, HalifaxRef 17-450
At the junction of Queens Road and King Cross Road

Shepherds' Rest, LumbuttsRef 17-423
Heyhead, Langfield


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Shepherds' Rest, SowerbyRef 17-582
Hubberton / Steep Lane / New Barton.

Aka The Riggin.

It closed [19??] and was converted into housing


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Shepherds' Rest, Sowerby BridgeRef 17-563
East Parade / 125 Bolton Brow.

Some of the injured in the 1907 Pye Nest Tram Disaster were treated here.

This is discussed in the books Halifax Pubs and Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Sam Senior


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Shibden Mill InnRef 17-201
In the early 19th century, an alternative name was the Board Inn.

A room is dated 1643. On 5th August 1890, the former Shibden Mill was sold to Webster's brewery.

The mill pond was drained and filled in to prevent water seeping into local mines, and the car park now stands on the site.

The present inn was the miller's home.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Ship, BrighouseRef 17-843
Ship Street / 5 Victoria Street.

It is said that the boatmen on the canal would disembark at the Anchor Bridge, then go for a drink in the Ship Inn, and then run on to rejoin their barge at the Huddersfield Road Bridge.

The pub closed in 1906 following the Licensing Act [1904].


Question: If the pub really did close in 1906, does anyone know when it re-opened?

 

The pub closed on 31st July 1936

Tenants are recorded when the address was Victoria Street:

Tenants are recorded when the address was Ship Street:

See Cyril Sunderland


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 18??: Mr Macauley
  • 1881: George Gledhill
  • 1894: John Haigh
  • 19??: J. Mornington
  • 1901: Sam Crowther

 


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Ship Inn, HalifaxRef 17-1298
Bull Green. Recorded in 1866, when it was owned by the Woodland Brewery, Boothtown

Ship Inn, HalifaxRef 17-884
1 Waterside.

It was originally a house called Brookroyds, Halifax.

The property was taken over by Stocks Brewery in 1852.

The pub closed when the licence expired on 3rd January 1911. Trade had fallen off after several local mills and works had closed.

It was a Stocks pub [until 1914].

It became a private dwelling and John Longbottom – the last landlord – continued to live there.

See Thomas Barker


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Ships used in pubs buildingRef 17-1171
There are a couple of pubs in the district which have used wood from ships in their construction.

See Old White Beare, Norwood Green, Prince of Wales, Brighouse and Royal Oak, Halifax

Shoulder of Mutton, BlackshawheadRef 17-611
Burnley Road.

Popularly known as the Top Shoulder – so as to distinguish it from the Shoulder of Mutton, Hebden Bridge.

It closed in 1998.

It is now a private house


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1842: Thomas Clegg
  • 1845: William Greenwood
  • 1861: Thomas Greenwood
  • 1864: William Greenwood
  • 1874: Sarah Greenwood
  • 1891: Young Sunderland
  • 1905: Felix Hampton
  • 1917: Thomas Stansfield

 

Shoulder of Mutton, GreetlandRef 17-730
Wellgate / Lindwell.

It was a Ramsden pub.

The pub closed in 1974.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Shoulder of Mutton, HalifaxRef 17-1086
Aka Old Shoulder of Mutton. 11 Russell Street / 14 Petticoat Lane. Opened in 1819.

The pub closed in 1892


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Daniel Sugden
  • 1829: Daniel Sugden
  • 1834: George Peel
  • 1837: George Peel
  • 1845: John Crapper
  • 1850: John Crapper
  • 1858: John Crapper
  • 1864: Josiah Bailey
  • 1871: Joseph Fielding – [aged 38]
  • 1874: Joseph Fielding
  • 1881: William Bellamy
  • 1887: Mrs M. A. Crabtree

 

Shoulder of Mutton, HalifaxRef 17-991
4/5 Cow Green.

Opened in 1778.

The pub closed in 1920

See Mary Astin and Stanleys Arms, Halifax


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1816: Samuel Bates
  • 1822: Nancy Bates
  • 1829: Nancy Bates

 

Shoulder of Mutton, Hebden BridgeRef 17-210
Bridge Gate.

It was a Grove pub.

Planning applications show that this was a Whitaker pub [February 1907].

It was boarded up [February 2011].

This is discussed in the books Halifax Pubs and Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Grove Brewery, Brearley, Bernard Hartley, Hebden Bridge Economic Stores and Top Shoulder, Blackshawhead


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Shoulder of Mutton, MidgleyRef 17-204
Towngate.

Opened in 1789.

The pub – and 4 cottages – were built by George Patchett on the site of his father's Broad Door Stones house.

It was owned by Richard Patchett. He demolished the pub in 1831 and built the Shoulder of Mutton on the site.

The Midgley Radical Association met here. During renovation after its closure as an inn in 1956, an old pike-head – thought to date from its days as a Chartist meeting-place – was found hidden above a doorway.

The pub closed on 30th April 1956. The license was transferred to the Sportsman.

It is now a private house.

The inn sign is still visible.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs.

See Halifax & Calder Vale Hunt, Order of Peaceful Doves, Isaac Townsend and Acquilla Walker


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Shoulder of Mutton, Mount TaborRef 17-848
32 Moor End Road / Clough Lane / Opposite Mixenden Old Hall.

In 1901, the pub – which was then owned by Harry Aspinall's Spring Head Brewery at Mount Tabor – was rebuilt.

The pub closed [2nd February 1939] and the licence was transferred to the Station Hotel at Holmfield


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Shoulder of Mutton, MytholmroydRef 17-206
Cragg Road / 56 New Road.

It was a Grove pub, then it was a Whitaker pub.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Stepping Stones, Mytholmroyd


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Shoulder of Mutton, NorthowramRef 17-203
1 Mutton Fold, Towngate.

A stone lintel is dated 1622.

The building incorporates Priestley Hall.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Shoulder of Mutton, OvendenRef 17-207
4 Moor End


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Shoulder of Mutton, RastrickRef 17-917


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Joseph Eastwood

 

Shoulder of Mutton, ShelfRef 17-202
Carr House Lane.

It was a Bentley's Yorkshire Breweries pub [1965]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1842: John Wilkinson
  • 1845: John Wilkinson
  • 1858: David Sharp
  • 1861: Thomas Helliwell
  • 1864: Samuel Wood
  • 1887: William Jagger
  • 1894: William Jagger
  • 1917: Mrs Selina Jagger

 

Shoulder of Mutton, SouthowramRef 17-154
16 Cain Lane.

Aka The Mutton Inn [1891]

Planning applications show that this was a Stocks pub [October 1903].

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Shoulder of Mutton, SouthowramRef 17-192
Law Lane.

Recorded on maps produced in 1854, and is shown on the west side of Law Lane near the junction with Cain Lane

Shoulder of Mutton, SowerbyRef 17-1020
Towngate


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Shoulder of Mutton, TodmordenRef 17-962
122 Burnley Road / Toad Carr, Stansfield.

About 1783, Mary and Jonas Turner established the pub.

The Toadcarr Library met here in 1817.

The name was changed to the House that Jack Built when it was rebuilt by Jack Brook [1974].

It later took the name Jack's House, and remains so [2013]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Shoulder of Mutton, TodmordenRef 17-974
Blackshawhead.

The pub closed in 1998. There are plans to redevelop the site for residential use


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: John Turner
  • 1845: William Greenwood
  • 1871: Thomas Ingham
  • 1877: Thomas Ingham
  • 1881: Samuel Campbell

 

Siddal Place, SiddalRef 17-564
1/49 Oxford Lane.

It was a Webster's pub [December 1890].

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Siddal TavernRef 17-731
Aspinall Street / 11 Hardaker Street.

Opened in 1869.

This was originally a beer house.

It was a Webster's pub [1905].

The pub closed in 1947


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1871: John Crowther
  • 1881: Joseph Crowther
  • 1891: Joseph Rushworth
  • 1901: Mrs Emily Rushworth
  • 1905: Samuel Womersley
  • 1908: Samuel Womersley
  • 1908: Sam Wade
  • 1911: Sam Wade
  • 1911: Fred Murray
  • 1916: Fred Murray
  • 1916: Joseph Aspinall
  • 1920: Joseph Aspinall
  • 1920: John William Murray
  • 1927: John William Murray
  • 1927: David Goswell
  • 1932: David Goswell
  • 1932: Frank Crossley Crowther
  • 1934: Frank Crossley Crowther
  • 1934: Arnold Lord Sonley
  • 1934: Robert Henry Nicholls
  • 1935: Robert Henry Nicholls
  • 1935: Joe Marsden
  • 1937: Joe Marsden
  • 1937: Crossley Farrell
  • 1939: Crossley Farrell
  • 1939: Harry Horne
  • 1947: Harry Horne

 

Sign of the Church, HalifaxRef 17-318
Church Street.

The Loyal Georgean Society held their first meetings here.

Renamed Ring o' Bells


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Silk Mill, RippondenRef 17-1332
Restaurant/pub. Formerly the Commercial

Silvers Bar, HalifaxRef 17-1076
Central Street / Silver Street. Formerly the Coiners

Single Sisters, SouthowramRef 17-1021


Question: Does anyone know exactly where the pub was located, or anything else about it?

 


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Samuel Haigh
  • 1829: Samuel Haigh

 

Slave's Rest, TodmordenRef 17-909
On 5th January 1849, Mrs William Fielden commenced
selling ale, &c. here

Slip, HalifaxRef 17-1053
North Bridge

In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the New Slip Inn applied for, but was refused, a music and dancing licence


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Matthew Naylor

 

Smiling Mule, HalifaxRef 17-1362
A popular name for the Crown & Anchor, Halifax [1844, 1910]

Smiling Mule, Upper BrackensRef 17-1027

See Upper Brackens

Smiths' Arms, HalifaxRef 17-732
Aka Smiths Inn.

33 Corporation Street / Crib Lane.

This was originally a beer house.

It was a Whitaker pub.

The pub closed in 1967 and was demolished when Burdock Way was constructed.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs.

See Stannary Inn, Halifax


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Smithy Stake Inn, HalifaxRef 17-1277
In September 1900, the pub changed its name to the Kimberley Arms


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • April 1897: Sarah Casson
  • November 1897: George Casson
  • December 1897: John Johnson

 

Sour Milk Hall, ClaremountRef 17-733
14/16 Horley Green Road / Miles Street.

This was originally a beer house established at the former 17th century farmhouse.

The pub closed in the 1960s.

The building was demolished in 1976.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Sourhall, TodmordenRef 17-456
Parkin Lane. Aka The Sour Hall. Early 18th century house. Formerly known as the Dog & Partridge Inn.

The inn closed when the turnpike road was opened, and the licence was transferred to the Spring Gardens Inn

Sovereign, HalifaxRef 17-839
16 Charlestown Road. Opened in 1867.

The pub closed in 1910 following the Licensing Act [1904]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Spa House Inn, RishworthRef 17-1047
Booth Dean. Aka Spaw, Spa Inn.

In the 19th century, the waters of the spring here were accredited with special medicinal qualities. The beer brewed here was also said to have beneficial properties.

The building was demolished in 19??


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1841: Henry Fox
  • 1845: William Fisher
  • 1853: George Sykes
  • 1859: George Sellers – who declined to take up the licence again in 1859

 

Spa Inn, Cragg ValeRef 17-734
Cragg Road

It was a Whitaker pub [1910]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Spinners, HalifaxRef 17-844
The popular name for the Lee Bridge Tavern

Spinners' Rest, KnowlwoodRef 17-911
Knowlwood Road. Built around 1820.

James Dawson bought the building and opened this as a beerhouse known as the Black Horse in 1828.

About 1831, it was taken over by Jeremiah Howarth who re-named it the Spinners Rest.

The pub closed in 19??. It is now a private house.

See Black Horse, Walsden


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Sporting Life, WheatleyRef 17-1111
Built by Samuel Webster in 1966 to supersede the Lane Ends, Wheatley.

It was renamed MacMillan's [1983]

Sportsman's Arms, LumbuttsRef 17-949
The name is recorded in 1907.

The name was changed to the Dog & Partridge, Lumbutts by 1909


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: John Mitton

 

Sportsman's Arms, PortsmouthRef 17-1017
In February 1872, the licensee, Jonathan Crabtree, was fined 5/8d for keeping a disorderly house


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Sportsman, BlackshawheadRef 17-1102


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1874: John Mitchell
  • 1864: John Holdsworth
  • 1905: Ellen Veevers

 

Sportsman, BoothtownRef 17-736
Ploughcroft / Pule Nick / Lee Lane.

This was originally a beer house.

The pub was owned by Boardmans United Breweries Limited [1904]. It was acquired by Bentley's Yorkshire Breweries [8th February 1922].

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1861: John Booth
  • 1871: John Booth
  • 1881: Joseph Taylor
  • 1891: William Henry Wood
  • 1894: Milford Earnshaw
  • 1901: Ralph Simon Demaine
  • 1924: Ralph Simon Demaine
  • 1924: Mrs Kate Demaine
  • 1938: Mrs Kate Demaine
  • 1938: Edgar Mitchell
  • 1946: Edgar Mitchell
  • 1946: Harry Hawkins
  • 1954: Harry Hawkins
  • 1954: Charles Geoffrey Varley
  • 1956: Charles Geoffrey Varley
  • 1956: Edward Douglas Jackson
  • 1958: Edward Douglas Jackson
  • 1958: Charles Fleming
  • 1959: Charles Fleming
  • 1959: John Leckenby
  • 1960: John Leckenby
  • 1980: Thomas Owen Roberts
  • 1961: Thomas Owen Roberts
  • 1961: George Bates

 

Sportsman, Cragg ValeRef 17-608
Four Gates End, Cragg Road.

This was originally a beer house.

Opened in 1923.

It was a Tetley house.

In 1930, Webster's bought the property for £850.

The pub closed in August 1959.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Sportsman, EllandRef 17-215


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1845: George Bowes

 

Sportsman's, GreetlandRef 17-315


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Sportsman, HalifaxRef 17-216
37/ 39 Swine Market / 48 New Crown Street.

Early 18th century pub.

The front was rebuilt in 1904 by William Henry Dodgson Horsfall for Ramsden's.

The pub was known as The Rose & Crown at the end of the 18th century.

The name then became the Cooper's Arms / the Sportsman / the Gundog [2016].

See Argyle Street, Halifax, Henry Gaukroger and Halifax & District Licensed Victuallers' Wine & Beersellers' Protection & Benevolent Association


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1829: George Parke
  • 1850: George Parke
  • 1864: William Priestley
  • 1874: Samuel Riley
  • 1881: Samuel Riley – [aged 45]
  • 1887: James Smith
  • 1891: William Brearley
  • 1894: William Brearley
  • 1900: Robert S. Winskill
  • 1905: John Robinson
  • 1907: John Robinson
  • 1907: Mrs Rose Hannah Robinson
  • 1908: Mrs Rose Hannah Robinson
  • 1908: Herbert Balme
  • 1913: Herbert Balme
  • 1913: Greenwood Dawson
  • 1927: Greenwood Dawson
  • 1927: Fred White Baker
  • 1929: Fred White Baker
  • 1929: Walter John Lingard
  • 1936: Walter John Lingard
  • 1936: Norman Stanley Jackson
  • 1944: Norman Stanley Jackson
  • 1944: Arthur Ernest Seaman
  • 1947: Arthur Ernest Seaman
  • 1947: Frances Canning
  • 1949: Frances Canning
  • 1949: Henry Arthur Childs
  • 1951: Henry Arthur Childs
  • 1951: Herbert Webb
  • 1952: Herbert Webb
  • 1952: Harold Wilson
  • 1952: Harold Wilson
  • 1952: George Ternent Stephenson
  • 1954: George Ternent Stephenson
  • 1954: Percival Frank Arkley Parkinson
  • 1958: Percival Frank Arkley Parkinson
  • 1958: Ernest Marsh
  • 1961: Ernest Marsh
  • 1961: James Kenyon
  • 1961: James Kenyon
  • 1961: Jack Benson
  • 1963: Jack Benson
  • 1963: Douglas Stuart Craven
  • 1963: Peter Allan Dawson
  • 1963: Peter Allan Dawson

 

Sportsman, Hebden BridgeRef 17-213
/ Colden. Jack Bridge, Burnley Road.

Early 19th century.

It was known as the New Delight [1891].

It is known locally as The Newdy


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Sportsman, HipperholmeRef 17-1217


Question: Henry Shaw was landlord of the Sportsman in the 1871 census, and at the Hare & Hounds, Hipperholme in 1874. Does anyone know whether the pub changed its name at some time?

 


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1871: Henry Shaw

 

Sportsman, IllingworthRef 17-735
Cow Hill Gate Lane, Keighley Road / Bradshaw Lane.

This was originally a beer house.

It acquired a full licence in 1965.

It was a Stocks pub, then it was a Webster's pub.

It is now [2015] a private house.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1896: William Garnett [when it was tied to Stocks' Brewery]
  • 1905: Arthur Craven

 

Sportsman Inn, HolmfieldRef 17-1215
Keighley Road / Bradshaw Lane / Park Lane Ends


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1936: Samuel Atkins

 

Sportsman, MidgleyRef 17-737
Jim Allen Lane / Towngate.

The license was transferred to here from the Shoulder of Mutton.

In 1894, brewers Cotton & Wood leased the pub from the licensee Joseph Mitchell.

This was the last surviving pub in Midgley.

It closed in 1990.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1894: Joseph Mitchell
  • 1899: Thomas Henry Walton
  • 1902: Thomas Henry Walton
  • 1902: James Spencer
  • 1906: James Spencer
  • 1906: Andrew Mellor
  • 1907: Andrew Mellor
  • 1907: John Walsh
  • 1909: John Walsh
  • 1909: Arthur Moss
  • 1916: Arthur Moss
  • 1916: Tom Wilson
  • 1920: Tom Wilson
  • 1920: Joseph Simpson
  • 1922: Joseph Simpson
  • 1922: Walter Mansley
  • 1923: Walter Mansley
  • 1923: Ann Mansley
  • 1924: Ann Mansley
  • 1924: Tom Johnson Horner
  • 1930: Tom Johnson Horner
  • 1930: Albert Oliver
  • 1934: Albert Oliver
  • 1934: Rupert Buckley
  • 1942: Rupert Buckley
  • 1942: Allen Beaumont
  • 1943: Allen Beaumont
  • 1943: Michael Finigan
  • 1944: Michael Finigan
  • 1944: Harold Wild
  • 1947: Harold Wild
  • 1947: Fred Sutcliffe
  • 1953: Fred Sutcliffe
  • 1953: John William Wilson
  • 1954: John William Wilson
  • 1954: William Edward Fairclough
  • 1955: William Edward Fairclough
  • 1955: Donald Charles Campe
  • 1956: Donald Charles Campe
  • 1956: Edgar Davis
  • 1956: Edgar Davis
  • 1956: Dennis Ian Headon
  • 1959: Dennis Ian Headon
  • 1959: Kenneth Crowther
  • 1960: Kenneth Crowther
  • 1960: Lewis Smith
  • 1977: Eira Cox

 

Sportsman, QueensburyRef 17-840
Smallpage Road.

The pub closed in 1911 following the Licensing Act [1904]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Sportsman, RastrickRef 17-845
41 Birds Royd Lane.

The pub closed in 1901.

The Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway Company bought the land. The building was amongst the property demolished to make way for extensions to the railway


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Sportsman, Sowerby BridgeRef 17-738
5 Foundry Street / 29 Sowerby Street.

It was an Alderson pub.

The pub closed with the extinction of the licence [12th December 1914], because it stood close to several other pubs: the Pear Tree [which was 35 yards away], the Woolpack [66 yards away], the West End Tavern [66 yards away], the Castle Hotel [100 yards away], the Bridge Street Hotel [100 yards away], the Royal Oak [117 yards away], the Royal Hotel [131 yards away], the New Inn [145 yards away], the Stirk Bridge Inn [157 yards away], and the Reed [198 yards away], and the Sportsman was redundant.

In 1915, James Alderson & Company Limited converted the pub into 3 cottages


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Sportsman, SoylandRef 17-214
Mill Bank / Triangle / Foxen Lane. Late 17th century building.

One of a group of buildings at Damside, Soyland.

Opened as a pub in 1863.

This is discussed in the book Our Home & Country.

There appears to be some overlap with this pub and the Damside which was next door.

Closed in 1927.

It is now a private house called Dan y Coed / The Homestead


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Sportsman, StansfieldRef 17-212
Kebcote / Kebs Road.

The pub was in the hands of the Midgley family for generations.

It was for sale in 2004


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Spotted Cow, HalifaxRef 17-1046
Gibbet Street. Recorded in 1859.

In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the pub applied for, but was refused, a music and dancing licence

Spread Eagle, EllandRef 17-921


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Bathsheba Garside

 

Spread Eagle, HalifaxRef 17-1054
7 Woolshops.

This was originally a beer house.

Recorded in 1757 & 1762, when it was the venue for a travelling menagerie.

This is discussed in the book Views of Ancient Buildings in the Parish of Halifax


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Spread Eagle, HalifaxRef 17-1340
Old Market.

The pub was demolished by 1879.

The pub was mentioned in the Coiners' trial when the innkeeper Bates gave evidence.

This is discussed in John Leyland's Views of Ancient Buildings in the Parish of Halifax.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1770s: Mr Bates

 

Spread Eagle, Hebden BridgeRef 17-922
19 Heptonstall Road / Bottom of Heptonstall Bank.

In February 1908, compensation was paid to the pub under the terms of the Licensing Act [1904].

Planning applications show that this was a Whitaker pub [August 1908].

The pub closed in 19??. It was demolished in 19??


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1881: John Greenwood
  • 1891: John Greenwood
  • 1901: John Greenwood
  • 1905: Thomas Redman

 

Spread Eagle, RishworthRef 17-217
Rishworth Mill Lane, Butts Green.

Opened in 1800, when it was known as The Butts Green.

The pub closed on 31st December 1948 (extinction of licence).

It is now a private house [2008].

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Spring Gardens, EllandRef 17-442
45 Elland Lane. Built in 1810.

It was a Stocks pub [1895, 1903].

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Spring Gardens, Ovenden WoodRef 17-346
In 1870, a part of Spring Lea house was converted to a pub

An advertisement for the business in May 1882 announced


MRS. WESTON
SPRING GARDENS HOTEL
OVENDEN WOOD PLEASURE GARDENS
Will supply Good Teas
Short distance from Pellon Trams
Table Tennis provided

The pub closed in 1919.

This is discussed in the books Halifax Pubs Volume Two and Sketches of Old Halifax


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1870: Mr Wright – when it was known as Wright's Gardens
  • 1881: Wright Horsfall – who was also a farmer of 16 acres
  • 1887: Mrs H. Horsfall
  • 1890: Alfred Howes
  • 1902: Mrs Sarah Weston
  • 1905: Mrs Sarah Weston
  • 1911: John Rhodes Fawcett

 

Spring Gardens, TodmordenRef 17-929
Near Todmorden Hall. The licence was transferred to here when the Sourhall closed after the Todmorden Turnpike was opened.

The Humility Lodge of the Todmorden Oddfellows was established here when Thomas Hartley was the licensee


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Spring Rock, GreetlandRef 17-1118
Wall Nook / Brick Green.

In 1850, Spring Beck Farm was here.

This was originally a beer house owned by (the executors of) J. Thornton of Elland [1903].

Planning applications show that this was an Ainley pub [1928].

It became an inn around 1935.

This was a popular venue for games of Knur & spell. The world championship was held here in 1970


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Springfield, HalifaxRef 17-739
Abbey Street / 80 Prospect Street / Range Bank.

Opened in 1873.

This was originally a beer house

It was a Brear & Brown pub [1887].


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Square & Compasses, HalifaxRef 17-431
Illingworth


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1834: Simeon Firth

 

Square Road Tavern, HalifaxRef 17-1311
Woolshops.

Recorded on 22nd October 1869 when


Emma Smith of the Square Road Tavern beerhouse was charged with having on the 6th October 1869 fraudulently removed certain goods out of the house she occupied, with intent to defeat the just claim of the landlord upon them for rent. The defendant owed £25 rent to Mrs Tatham, brewer of Mixenden
 

Staff of Life, BrighouseRef 17-3123
Commercial Street.

In 1873, a diarist visited the pub and commented that

if they had [called it] the Staff of Death it would have been nearer the truth

The name was changed to the Ring O' Bells in 1874 when a new set of bells was installed in St Martin's Parish Church.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two

Staff of Life, CornholmeRef 17-1123
548 / 550 Burnley Road / 14 Knotts Grove [1891].

Originally called the Peeping Tom of Coventry.

In the 1840s, the tenant Thomas Crossley built a new pub which he called the Peeping Tom. The original pub was renamed the Staff of Life

In 1960, the licence was changed from a beerhouse to an alehouse.

It was owned by J. Baxter & Company Limited of Waterfoot in 19??.

It was for sale in 2004. It appears to have resurfaced as a pub.

See Eagle Crag, Todmorden and Robinwood Brewers & Vintners


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 18??: Josiah Crabtree
  • 1840s: Thomas Crossley
  • 1866: James Fielden
  • 1891: Henry Crabtree
  • 1904: William Crabtree
  • 1908: William Crabtree
  • 1911: Fred Crabtree
  • 1922: Fred Crabtree
  • 1936: Daniel Sutcliffe
  • 1937: Daniel Sutcliffe
  • 1937: Harry Banks
  • 1938: Harry Banks
  • 1938: James Howorth
  • 1939: James Howorth
  • 1939: Harry Long
  • 1940: Harry Long
  • 1940: Josiah Sutcliffe
  • 1941: Josiah Sutcliffe
  • 1941: Catherine Burton
  • 1944: Catherine Burton
  • 1944: Verdi Ashworth
  • 1947: Verdi Ashworth
  • 1947: Frederick Barker
  • 1949: Frederick Barker
  • 1949: Albert Fielden
  • 1953: Albert Fielden
  • 1953: George Battersby
  • 1955: George Battersby
  • 1955: Charles Sydney Townend
  • 1956: Charles Sydney Townend
  • 1956: Ambrose Chathock

 

Staff of Life, EllandRef 17-1038
Briggate.

The pub closed in 19??

Stafford Arms, HalifaxRef 17-990
Huddersfield Road.

In 2010, it was converted into a restaurant:

  • The Chili Lounge [2014]

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Stag & Pheasant, BrighouseRef 17-992
Park Street / 20 Bethel Street.

The pub closed in 1927. Now Taylor's hairdresser's shop


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Stag's Head, QueensburyRef 17-667
Sandbeds.

The inn was owned by John Foster & Sons. It sold to William Whitaker & Sons of Bradford [around 1905]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1884: John Peters
  • 1895: George Tyson Ray
  • 1905: George Tyson Ray
  • 1905: Fred Poole
  • 1906: Fred Poole
  • 1906: Thomas Abraham Horner
  • 1915: Thomas Abraham Horner
  • 1915: Matthias Gosney
  • 1917: Matthias Gosney
  • 1917: George Stansfield
  • 1919: George Stansfield
  • 1919: Webster Greenwood
  • 1922: Webster Greenwood
  • 1922: John Hudson
  • 1923: John Hudson
  • 1923: Stanley Haigh
  • 1923: Charles Newton
  • 1924: Charles Newton
  • 1924: Joseph Albert Pickles
  • 1925: Joseph Albert Pickles
  • 1925: Lily Pickles
  • 1926: Lily Pickles
  • 1926: James William Greenwood
  • 1927: James William Greenwood
  • 1927: Frederick Walker Gomersall
  • 1931: Frederick Walker Gomersall
  • 1931: Ambrose William Hollingworth
  • 1933: Ambrose William Hollingworth
  • 1933: Cyril Cutts Burrows
  • 1935: Cyril Cutts Burrows
  • 1935: Albert Edward Shackleton
  • 1937: Albert Edward Shackleton
  • 1937: Harry Beverley
  • 1938: Harry Beverley
  • 1938: Henry Westerman
  • 1939: Henry Westerman
  • 1939: Eric Howes
  • 1940: Eric Howes
  • 1940: Annie Howes
  • 1945: Annie Howes
  • 1945: Elzabeth Howes
  • 1946: Elzabeth Howes
  • 1946: Eric Howes
  • 1961: Eric Howes
  • 1961: Arthur Baldwin

 

Stag's Head, ShibdenRef 17-1045
Mytholm.

Aka The Stag.


Question: Is this the same place as the Lister's Arms and/or the Nag's Head, Halifax?

 

This had 4 acres of land, and was part of the Shibden Hall estate.

Anne Lister collected the estate rents here.

She was displeased when the pub was used as a meeting place for the Masons' & Delvers' Union, & warned Mallinson that this must stop.

The pub closed in 1867


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Jonathan Mallinson
  • 1845: John Mallinson
  • 1861: Mrs Mary Mallinson
  • 1864: James Empsall

 

Stag, HeptonstallRef 17-220
Main Street. Aka The Sign of the Stag. A room in the Inn was known as the Star Chamber. The stocks stood near the Inn.

In February 1909, compensation was paid to the pub under the terms of the Licensing Act [1904]. They received £1,300 on 27th July 1909. The inn closed in 1909.

The property was acquired by the Heptonstall Co-operative Society


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Standard of Freedom, HalifaxRef 17-316
Skircoat Green / 2 Lower Skircoat Green [1901].

This was originally a beer house.

It was originally known as the Waggoners' Inn, but was renamed after the landlord made a speech about the Chartists which included the phrase

The people of Skircoat Green shall join in that march of freedom and I will raise the Standard of Freedom at this inn

In the 1840s, Chartists who assembled for a meeting on The Moor met here, having smuggled their pamphlets in a coffin.

It was a Whitaker pub [1897].

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Stanleys Arms, HalifaxRef 17-846
5 Cow Green. Opened in 1778.

The pub closed in 1920.

See Shoulder of Mutton, Halifax

Stannary Inn, HalifaxRef 17-492
2 Green Lane / Stannary Lane.

In the 1840s, Richard Whitaker had a brewery in cottages here at what was known as Seedlings Mount.

In June 1859, the licence was transferred from Richard Whitaker to Thomas Fitton.

The pub opened in 1859.

In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the pub applied for, and was granted, a music and dancing licence.

The pub closed in 1967 and was demolished when Burdock Way was constructed.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs.

See Smith's Arms, Halifax


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1859: Thomas Fitton
  • 1861: Thomas Fitton
  • 1871: Watson Carter
  • 1874: Watson Carter
  • 1877: Watson Carter
  • 1881: William Whitaker
  • 1887: Mrs Hannah Appleyard
  • 1891: Mrs Hannah Appleyard
  • 1894: Mrs Hannah Appleyard
  • 1901: Fred Dyson
  • 1904: Robert Stockdale Winskill
  • 1906: Robert Stockdale Winskill
  • 1906: Benjamin Howarth
  • 1908: Benjamin Howarth
  • 1908: Harry Calvert
  • 1912: Harry Calvert
  • 1912: John Stansfield
  • 1914: John Stansfield
  • 1917: John Stansfield
  • 1925: John Stansfield
  • 1925: Albert Naylor
  • 1930: Albert Naylor
  • 1930: Albert Hargreaves
  • 1936: Arthur Hargreaves
  • 1940: Albert Hargreaves
  • 1940: Herbert Auty
  • 1941: Herbert Auty
  • 1941: Adrian Edmund Henry Bannister
  • 1942: Adrian Edmund Henry Bannister
  • 1942: John Moulding Thornton
  • 1947: John Moulding Thornton
  • 1947: Richmond Gledhill
  • 1951: Richmond Gledhill
  • 1951: Thomas McDermott
  • 1960: Thomas McDermott
  • 1960: Phyllis McDermott
  • 1961: Phyllis McDermott
  • 1961: Willie Haigh
  • 1962: Willie Haigh
  • 1962: Jack Marsden

 

Stansfeld Arms, RippondenRef 17-1196
Built by George Stansfeld about 1800 as a coaching inn.

It became the Prince of Orange [1819] and eventually the Queen Hotel, Ripponden

Stansfield's Temperance Hotel, TodmordenRef 17-1288
Recorded in 1892, when a meeting here decided that a local cyclists' club become the Todmorden Cycling Club

Star, EllandRef 17-971
4 New Street.

Originally 2 houses.

The pub closed in 1966.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Star, GreetlandRef 17-511
Hoults Lane, Lindwell.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Star Hotel, HalifaxRef 17-48
Weymouth Street / 18 Orange Street.

This was originally a beer house.

In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the pub applied for, and was granted, a music and dancing licence.

Later, it was a Whitaker pub lc.

The pub survived for many years whilst all around it was being demolished and modernised.

It closed in 1998.

The building was still standing, though boarded up, until it was finally demolished for the Broad Street development [2008].

The Hotel is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Star Boxing Club


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1841: John Appleyard
  • 1851: John Appleyard
  • 1851: Ann Appleyard
  • 1875: Ann Appleyard
  • 1881: Henry Rushworth
  • 1902: Henry Rushworth
  • 1905: Thomas Henry Spencer
  • 1916: Thomas Henry Spencer
  • 1916: Ely Mitchell
  • 1930: Ely Mitchell
  • 1930: Percival Sugden
  • 1932: Percival Sugden
  • 1932: Fred Thwaites
  • 1945: Fred Thwaites
  • 1945: William Robinson
  • 1947: William Robinson
  • 1947: Jack Wharam
  • 1954: Jack Wharam
  • 1954: Reginald Molineaux
  • 1955: Reginald Molineaux
  • 1955: John Olive
  • 1956: John Olive
  • 1956: Harry Pratt
  • 1957: Harry Pratt
  • 1957: John Grimshaw
  • 1958: John Grimshaw
  • 1958: Austin Gleeson
  • 1959: Austin Gleeson
  • 1959: Raymond Leonard Souster
  • 1962: Raymond Leonard Souster
  • 1962: Allen Owen
  • 1998: Margaret Dillon

 

Star, Lob MillRef 17-1156


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1905: Ellen A. Uttley

 

Star, RastrickRef 17-222
29 Bridge End. Built in 1794. It was a coaching inn.

The pub was owned in turn by the Denham family, the Ormerod family, and the Lord family.

Mrs Dyson was descended from the Lord family, and her husband, John Exley Dyson, rebuilt the Inn in 1885.

In 1894, the Brighouse & Rastrick Naturalists' Society was established here.

In 1897, John Exley Dyson sold the pub to Tetley's Brewery.

Inquests were held here in the 19th century.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs

See A. B. Brook, Star Steps, Rastrick and Village Pride Lodge


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Star, RippondenRef 17-1025

Owners have included

The pub closed in 1928


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Star, RoberttownRef 17-601
During the Luddite raid on William Cartwright's mill at Rawfolds, on 11th April 1812, Samuel Hartley and John Booth were injured and taken to the inn. Both men died later

Star, SowerbyRef 17-221
Well Head Lane, Sowerby Green. Built in 1798 by Captain Jennings.

The property included the pub, an adjoining cottage, a slaughterhouse, a butcher's shop and other outbuildings. There was a pinfold and lockup behind the pub.

William Firth owned the pub [1854-1872].

John Rawson bought most of the property, excluding the pub, in 1868 for £505. He bought the pub in 1871 for £780.

It is now called The Rushcart and is a stopping-off point for the local Rushbearing procession.

A portrait of John Whiteley at the Pub is said to be the source of supernatural happenings.

One of Whiteley's poems was painted on a settle at the Inn


Debts and ale shots that are owing
If indulged in will keep growing
But the evil to destroy
my attorney I'll employ
Law shall get me what is just
And I'll shut the door on trust

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Star, SoylandRef 17-842
Opened in 1822.

There is a datestone EAW 1859 (possibly) for Ellis & Ann Whiteley.

The pub closed in 1909 following the Licensing Act [1904]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Star, TodmordenRef 17-920
Lord Street

Starving Rascal, BoothtownRef 17-746
Swales Moor Road. Aka Swalesmoor Inn

Station Hotel, EllandRef 17-454
Park Road.

Opened in the 1880s. Served Elland Railway Station.

It was known as the Railway, Elland [1861 to 1881]. It became the Station Hotel [1880s]

It was a Brear & Brown pub, then it was a Whitaker pub [1916].

In the 1980s, it was known as Bar Bados for a short time.

It is now the Barge & Barrel.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Station Hotel, HalifaxRef 17-S1
23 Church Street.

Built in the early 1800s.

It was a Brear & Brown pub [1896].

The pub closed on 22nd December 1927.

The Friendly Inn, Halifax is at Number 25 Church Street.

The Railway Hotel is further up Horton Street

See Crown Hotel, Halifax


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Station Hotel, HolmfieldRef 17-R380
247 Shay Lane.

The Shoulder of Mutton, Mount Tabor closed [2nd February 1939] and the licence was transferred to the Station Hotel.

It served the High Level Railway.

Now known as the Shant


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Station Hotel, Holywell GreenRef 17-1059
Station Road.

In the 1870s, when the railway came to Stainland, the name of the Waggon & Horses, Holywell Green was changed to the Station Hotel.

The inn was owned by John Shaw & Sons. It was acquired by Bentley's Yorkshire Breweries between 1903 & 1920.

The Firth's left in 1977, and in 1980 the name of the pub was changed to the Holywell Inn after licensee Ken France discovered a well – 60 ft deep – beneath an out-house


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Station Hotel, RastrickRef 17-497

Station House, EastwoodRef 17-223
Bottoms, Cockden.

Built around 1840 to serve Eastwood Railway Station. It superseded the Freemasons' Arms, Eastwood.

The pub closed in 1966


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Stephenson's Temperance HotelRef 17-1199
Around 1857, Mr Stephenson kept the Temperance Hotel, Broad Street, Halifax

See Broad Street Temperance Hotels

Steps Tavern, Sowerby BridgeRef 17-742
Steps Lane.

In 1915, they were owned by Walker & Company Brewers of Manchester.

The pub closed in 1934

See Ernest Greenwood and Steps Tavern Club


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Stewart's Vaults, HalifaxRef 17-743
Silver Street. Opened in 1868.

The Vaults closed on 2nd August 1942


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1914: Lucy K. Stewart
  • 1914: George Henry Stewart

 

Stirk Bridge Inn, NorlandRef 17-224
3 Scarr Head Road.

Recorded in the 16th century.

Planning applications show that this was a Ramsden pub [May 1906].

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

Closed about 2008.

It is now a private house


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Stocks Arms, NorthowramRef 17-225
The pub is named for the Stocks family – and not the stocks which used to be depicted on the inn-sign


Question: Does anyone know why the inn-sign depicted a man playing the violin? ... and why only one leg in the stocks?

 

In July 1869, John Buckley (a slubber) and Lawley Robinson (a turner) were charged with stealing a ham from the pub. Buckley pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 2 months' hard labour; There was doubt in the case of Robinson, and he was discharged with a caution.

The pub closed in 2009.

The building has since been

  • an Italian restaurant – 22 the Square [2017]

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Northowram Stocks


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Stocks, HeptonstallRef 17-610
The town stocks stood here.

The inn later became the Union Cross

Stone Chair, MixendenRef 17-1074
It was a Webster's pub [1866].

Now a restaurant.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1949: Allan Rusby

 

Stone Chair, Mount TaborRef 17-744
11 Moor End Road

The property was a dwelling house [1871, 1881].

It was a Webster's pub [1905].

It was granted a wine licence [1947]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1891: William Pickles
  • 1901: Joshua Kendall
  • 1905: Joshua Kendall
  • 1908: Joshua Kendall
  • 1908: Robert Atkin
  • 1909: Robert Atkin
  • 1909: Dan Farnell
  • 1930: Dan Farnell
  • 1931: Frank Drury Broadhead
  • 1931: Frank Drury Broadhead
  • 1931: Ernest Taylor
  • 1936: Ernest Taylor
  • 1936: Herbert Haigh
  • 1941: Herbert Haigh
  • 1941: Harry Barwick
  • 1944: Harry Barwick
  • 1944: Allan Rusby
  • 1951: Allan Rusby
  • 1951: Donald George Brier
  • 1955: Donald George Brier
  • 1955: Geoffrey Brown Naylor
  • 1958: Geoffrey Brown Naylor
  • 1958: Ernest Adams
  • 1959: Ernest Adams
  • 1959: William Barrow
  • 1960: William Barrow
  • 1960: Donald Wilkinson

 

Stone Chair, ShelfRef 17-565
Pub at Stone Chair, Shelf


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Stone Ridge, Holywell GreenRef 17-52
Another name for the Bull & Dog, Stainland

Stott's Arms, BrighouseRef 17-380
17 Wakefield Road. Early 19th century pub. It has Venetian windows and is a similar design to Phoenix House.

In 18??, James Maude Stott acquired the licence to the pub. In 1874, he sold the property to John Naylor.

The pub closed in 1998. The site is effectively a roundabout.

In March 2005, there was a proposal to convert it into offices and a fast-food outlet.

It is rapidly becoming an eyesore for people approaching Brighouse from the M62.

The fast-food outlet is open [2008], and the offices are used by a kitchen company [2010]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Stott's Temperance Hotel, HalifaxRef 17-1055
Broad Street. Recorded in 1845, when William Stott was proprietor.

See Broad Street Temperance Hotels

Strangers' Home, HalifaxRef 17-400
1 Clark Bridge / 1 Bank Bottom. Recorded in 1871. This is one of the beerhouses at Bank Bottom, Halifax.

The pub closed in 1899


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1871: Hugh Keenan
  • 1881: Patrick Moran
  • 1891: William Conroy
  • 1898: Joseph Pearson

 

Stubbing Wharf, Hebden BridgeRef 17-512
King Street. Built about 1800 by the Foster family of Erringden to serve the canal and the turnpike trade at Hebden Bridge.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs.

See Hebden Bridge Cattle Market


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1838: Henry Taylor
  • 1871: John Taylor
  • 1894: Mrs Betsy Taylor
  • 1900: J. T. Morrison
  • 1905: J. T. Morrison
  • 1917: C. E. Williams

 

Stump Cross InnRef 17-226
The original Stump Cross Inn stood on what is now the embankment of Godley cutting.

In 1827, the owner resisted the construction of the new cutting and would not allow the Inn to be demolished. The workmen ignored him and buried the building with the excavated earth.

The new Inn was built on top.

In 1834, Anne Lister bought the pub and Staups House.

In 1905, John Lister leased the pub to Brear & Brown.

At some point, it was a Whitaker pub.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs.

See Daniel Hemingway and Charles Howarth


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Sugden's Temperance Hotel, HalifaxRef 17-92
3 Northgate

See Halifax Republican Club


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1837: Joseph Sugden

 

Sun, BradshawRef 17-838
Soil Hill.

The pub closed in 1906 following the Licensing Act [1904]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Sun Dial, BrighouseRef 17-3137
Stood below Rydal Methodist Chapel at the junction of Briggate / Parsonage Lane, Brighouse.

About 1750, Mary Bedford's Charity School was held in the upper rooms.

In 1871, the property was occupied by John Bottomley and his family, although it was not known as the Sun Dial at that time.

The pub opened in 1882.

During the Irish riots of 1882, there were disturbances at the inn where the mob believed that the Fenians held their secret meetings. The pub was damaged and William Lawlor, the landlord – who was Irish – and his family hid from the mob, barricading themselves in the cellar for 3 days.

The pub closed in 1909 following the Licensing Act [1904].

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Haman Berry and Brighouse Floral Clock


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Sun Inn, BrighouseRef 17-1367
Elland Road.

Between 1870 and 1886, the Masons' Arms, Brighouse changed its name to the Sun Inn

Sun Inn, HalifaxRef 17-1343
Church Lane. Recorded on 5th October 1807, when Mrs Mael, wife of the landlord, died here


Question: Can anyone tell me anything about the pub?

 


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Sun Inn, HalifaxRef 17-229
1 Smithy Street / King Street / Winding Road / Woolshops.

Stood next to the Moon Inn


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Sun Inn, LightcliffeRef 17-S318
Wakefield Road.

Built in 1730 for the Walker family of Crow Nest and Cliffe Hill, and dated 1730 above a doorway.

It became a tenanted farm known as Mortimer's Farm.

In 1741, when the Wakefield to Halifax turnpike was made, The Sun became a coaching inn.

In 1867, Richard Whitaker & Sons bought the property for £870 as a part of the Crow Nest Estate.

In his Illustrated Rambles from Hipperholme to Tong of 1904, James Parker describes the inn as a baiting house.

It is now a restaurant/bar.

In September 2012, proposals to open a fish & chip shop here were rejected because

the smell would be too much of a temptation for the 600 pupils at Hipperholme & Lightcliffe High School

and would not be consistent with Calderdale Council's attempts to promote healthy eating.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs.

See Lightcliffe Gun Club


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Sun Inn, OvendenRef 17-1225
Soil Hill.

Originally known as the Gin Pit Inn, Ovenden

Sun Inn, QueensburyRef 17-841
The pub closed in 1906 following the Licensing Act [1904]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1895: James Weir

 

Sun Inn, RastrickRef 17-227
94 New Hey Road / Dewsbury Road cross roads.

There is a well beneath the pub.

The pub was owned by Joseph Carter who sold it to Whitaker's in 1896.

The Brighouse Lark Singing Association held their meetings here [1890s].

Grantham Park was behind the pub.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Black Horse, Rastrick and Grantham


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Sun Inn, WainstallsRef 17-1345
Rough Hall Lane. Aka The Rising Sun.

The building is dated

T & S Murgatroyd : Rebuilt : AD 1824


Question: Does anyone know if this T Murgatroyd was Thomas Murgatroyd?

 

The nearby Sun Buildings were erected when the property was reconstructed.

It is now 2 private dwellings

Sun Inn, WalsdenRef 17-923
835 Rochdale Road / Littleborough road. Opened in 18??.

The pub closed in 19??. It is now a private house


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Swalesmoor Inn, BoothtownRef 17-745
Aka The Starving Rascal, Cold Harbour, Northowram.

This was originally a beer house


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1881: William Houldsworth
  • 1901: Fred Firth
  • 1905: Fielding Wilson
  • 1939: Fielding Wilson
  • 1939: Owen Thristan
  • 1942: Owen Thristan
  • 1942: William Henry Thacker
  • 1949: William Henry Thacker
  • 1949: Frank Hartley
  • 1949: Frank Hartley
  • 1949: William Henry Wolfenden
  • 1951: William Henry Wolfenden
  • 1951: Arthur Stanley Bancroft
  • 1956: Arthur Stanley Bancroft
  • 1956: Marjorie Heward
  • 1958: Marjorie Heward
  • 1958: Angela Mary Croft
  • 1959: Angela Mary Croft
  • 1959: Harriet Emma Andrews

 

Swan Bank Tavern, HalifaxRef 17-391
Swan Bank Lane / Canal Street South / Caddy Field.

This was originally a beer house.

It was on the left as you go up Swan Bank, opposite Stoney Royd gardens.

In 1905, the tavern was owned by the Halifax Brewing Company.

The pub closed in 1977. The site was absorbed by the Mackintosh / Nestlé complex


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1871: George Lupton
  • 1881: George Lupton
  • 1905: Matthew Greenwood
  • 1915: Matthew Greenwood
  • 1915: Sam Wade
  • 1931: Sam Wade
  • 1931: Charles Gledhill
  • 1934: Charles Gledhill
  • 1934: Frank Crossley Crowther
  • 1939: Frank Crossley Crowther
  • 1930: William Crossley
  • 1944: William Crossley
  • 1944: Ivy Crossley
  • 1945: Ivy Crossley
  • 1945: John Watson Shackleton
  • 1948: John Watson Shackleton
  • 1948: Thomas Lawler
  • 1949: Thomas Lawler
  • 1949: Fred Walton
  • 1953: Fred Walton
  • 1953: Robert Morton Brown
  • 1954: Robert Morton Brown
  • 1954: Ernest Kershaw
  • 1956: Ernest Kershaw
  • 1956: Charles Glover
  • 1957: Charles Glover
  • 1957: Ernest Frank Greetham
  • 1958: Ernest Frank Greetham
  • 1958: James McHale
  • 1960: James McHale
  • 1960: Thomas Christopher Parker

 

Swan, HalifaxRef 17-890

See White Swan Inn & Posting House, Halifax

Swan, HeptonstallRef 17-1103
Aka The White Swan.

Around 18??, the mid 17th century building was divided into 3 dwellings, known as Swan Fold


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Swan, IllingworthRef 17-994


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: William Bland

 

Swan Inn, BrighouseRef 17-1321
Mentioned in the 19th century, this may refer to either of the Black Swan or the White Swan

Swan Inn, HoldsworthRef 17-528

Swan, StainlandRef 17-233
Outlane

It was owned by B. Ainley & Sons [1914].

The pub closed in 1916


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Swan, TodmordenRef 17-755
Halifax Road, Stansfield


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1917: Miss Ellen Ashworth

 

Swan with Two Necks, TodmordenRef 17-926
Halifax Road, Millwood


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1845: James Riley
  • 1861: James Ashworth
  • 1891: Martha Ashworth – [1836-1891]

 


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


© Malcolm Bull 2019
Revised 16:10 /8th October 2019 / p200_s / 255191

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