Joseph Rideal Smith

[1837-1915]



Contents:

Biography

Joseph Rideal Smith was [1837-1915] born on 30th December 1837 at the Waggoner's Inn, Northgate, where his father, Isaac Smith, was licensee.

He became a well-known local artist. He studied as an architect. He worked for the Surveyor's Department at Halifax Corporation. In 1874, he set up in business as an architect.

In 1845, the family left Halifax to live in London.

In 1856, he survived cholera and the family left London to farm on the Duke of Bedford's estate.

In 18??, he and his father farmed in Essex.

In 1868, he returned to Halifax because of ill health. He became the town's first sanitary inspector with Halifax Corporation and was instrumental in installing the goux system of closets in the town.

In 1873, he married Ann, daughter of Samuel Empsall.

Children:

  1. Harriet Rideal [1876-19??] who married Robert G. Whiteley

The family lived at 2 Craven Edge, Halifax [1881, 1891, 1901, 1911].

His artistic talents were recognised by Alderman Alfred Ramsden who had seen one of his sepia drawings of the Waggoner's Inn, and suggested that Smith make sketches from some of the pictures he had in his possession.

He produced a set of 12 drawings with views of the House at the Maypole, the Waggoner's Inn, Northgate, the Malt Shovel Inn, Northgate, Crown Street, Silver Street, Hall End, Woolshops, and North Bridge between 1888 and 1893. These were copied from other pictures or drawn from memory, and were possibly idealised. Each print was dedicated to local patrons and worthies – which were published by Stott Brothers as a bound volume which sold for £2 10/- under the title Old Halifax. These were so successful that Smith became known as Old Halifax.

He died on 21st February 1915.

He was buried at St Paul's Church, King Cross

He was buried at St Paul's Church, King Cross

The Old Halifax Prints

Between 1888 and 1893, Joseph Rideal Smith produced a set of 12 drawings depicting views of the streets and buildings in the centre of Halifax. These were copied from other pictures and photographs, or were drawn from memory. Many of them were probably idealised.

Each print was dedicated to a local patron or worthy, and these originally appeared as postcards. The collection was published by Stott Brothers as a bound volume under the title Old Halifax. These were so successful that Smith himself became known as Old Halifax.

The set of drawings included the following titles




© Malcolm Bull 2018
Revised 07:40 /14th March 2018 / qq_163 / 11557

search tips advanced search
site search by freefind

web counter