Schools & Sunday Schools

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Ibbetson's: Madame Ibbetson's Dancing School, Halifax
Established by Madame Amy Ibbotson. She was at 42 Prescott Street, Halifax [1936]. There were other branches at various locations in Sowerby Bridge, including Wharf Street and at Grange House.

See David Blair

Ibbetson's School, Halifax
Around 1838, Mary SCHOOL Ibbetson ran a private school at 35 Wade Street, Halifax

Ibbetson's School, Halifax
Around 1822, Sarah Ibbetson ran a private school at 8 Savile Green, Halifax

Ibbotson's: Madam Ibbotson's Dancing School
42 Prescott Street, Halifax. Run by Mrs Amy Ibbotson [1936]

Illingworth Church School
Built in 1825 as a Sunday school for Illingworth Church

Illingworth National School
A national school near St Mary's Church built by subscription in 1815.

George Secker was headmaster [1849-1876].

In 1860, the School was enlarged at the expense of Jane Moss and her sister, and separate departments for boys and girls established.

In 1861, Miss Emma Watson was mistress when she married Wilson Hartley

Illingworth's School, Sowerby Bridge
In 1861, Miss Emma Illingworth ran a day school at Town Hall Street, Sowerby Bridge

Inchfield Bottom Board School, Todmorden
A board school recorded in 1876

Inchfield Bottom United Methodist School
The school at Inchfield Bottom Methodist Chapel, Walsden.

On 19th February 1913, a portrait of Mayor Robert Jackson was presented to the school by Frank Stenhouse of Rochdale, formerly of Walsden

Independent Sunday School, Wheatley

Industrial school
From around 1846, an institution set up to help homeless and destitute children, removing them from bad influences and teaching and developing social skills equipping them for work and a trade. The children got up at 6.00 am and were involved in worship, education, housework, before going to bed at 7:00 pm. The boys learned trades such as gardening and tailoring, and the girls learned knitting, sewing, housework and washing.

Some children in schools at Liverpool, were brought to work in the mills of the Calder Valley.

The Industrial Schools Act 1857 gave magistrates the power to commit homeless and other children – between the ages of 7 and 14 – to a term in one of these institutions. From 1870, the local Education Committee were responsible for the schools.

See Richard Kershaw Lumb, Ragged School and Shibden Industrial School

Industrial School of the Good Shepherd, Southowram

Ingham's School, Halifax
Around 1822, Mrs Ingham ran a private school at Horton Street, Halifax

Ingham's School, Halifax
Around 1850, Miss Sarah Ingham ran a school at North Parade, Halifax

Inglemoor Girls' School & Kindergarten

See Misses Rouse Girls' School

Irving's School, Halifax
Around 1838, John Irving ran a private school at Mount Tabor, Halifax


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z



© Malcolm Bull 2017 / calderdale@aol.com
Revised 14:03 on 26th August 2017 / s70_i / 10